Justice Department uses prosecutorial discretion to seek decades in prison for legal Michigan cultivators

 

By ASA, Fri, September 28, 2012

Justice Department uses prosecutorial discretion to seek decades in prison for legal Michigan cultivators

 

article image

 

Detroit, MI — Five medical marijuana patients and caregivers will be sentenced in federal court next week, highlighting the human cost of the federal government’s intolerance for state medical marijuana laws.
Two medical marijuana caregivers from Monroe County who were convicted earlier this year in federal court will be sentenced at 3pm Monday, October 1st before U.S. District Court Judge David M. Lawson (231 W. Lafayette Blvd, Detroit). Gerald Lee Duval Jr., 52, and his son, Jeremy Duval, 30, were raided by Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents in 2011 and charged with felony cultivation, maintaining a place to cultivate marijuana, and conspiracy to distribute. In April, the Duvals were convicted at trial, the expected result of federal laws that prohibit any medical defense or reference to state law in front of juries.
“The Duvals’ case is another tragedy from President Obama’s war on medical marijuana,” said Steph Sherer, Executive Director of Americans for Safe Access (ASA), the country’s leading medical marijuana advocacy group. “This type of enforcement is completely discretionary, unnecessary and far from the public health approach that medical marijuana patients deserve.” The Duvals face decades in prison despite no evidence of state law violations.
Days later, three more medical marijuana patients and caregivers will be sentenced in federal court in Michigan. Around the same time federal agents were raiding the Duvals, officers with the Central Michigan Enforcement Team (CMET) and the Mecosta County Sheriff’s Department raided the Austin Township home and other property of John Marcinkewciz, 42, and Shelley Waldron, 42. Marcinkewciz, Waldron and Jaycob Montague, 26, were originally charged under state law with cultivation and conspiracy to cultivate, but prosecutors soon turned their cases over to the federal Justice Department, where the three had no chance of defending themselves against federal law. Marcinkewciz, Waldron and Montague all subsequently took plea bargains in May.
Waldron and Montague are scheduled to be sentenced at 8:45am on October 4th before Judge Robert Bell in U.S. District Court at 110 Michigan Street NW, Grand Rapids. Marcinkewciz is scheduled to be sentenced at 8:45am on October 5th before the same judge. In spite of the plea bargains, the three medical marijuana providers still face decades in prison.
“The federal raids and prosecutions in Michigan are unfortunately only an example of the broader aggressive campaign by the Obama Administration to undermine state medical marijuana laws,” continued Sherer. As with the Duval raid, DEA agents commonly burst onto the scene wearing full body armor and wielding machine guns in a clear attempt to intimidate. Despite claims by the president that he was “not going to be using Justice Department resources to try to circumvent state laws,” Obama’s Justice Department has conducted more than 200 SWAT-style raids and indicted well over 70 medical marijuana patients and providers since he took office.
A federal lawsuit to force the DEA to reclassify marijuana for medical use will be heard by the D.C. Circuit on October 16th. The case Americans for Safe Access v. DEA is bringing the science of medical marijuana into federal court for the first time in nearly 20 years. If marijuana were reclassified, the five people being sentenced in Michigan would be entitled to a medical defense, a right they are now denied.

 

CONTINUE READING…

Justice Department uses prosecutorial discretion to seek decades in prison for legal Michigan cultivators

By ASA, Fri, September 28, 2012

Justice Department uses prosecutorial discretion to seek decades in prison for legal Michigan cultivators

 

article image

 

Detroit, MI — Five medical marijuana patients and caregivers will be sentenced in federal court next week, highlighting the human cost of the federal government’s intolerance for state medical marijuana laws.
Two medical marijuana caregivers from Monroe County who were convicted earlier this year in federal court will be sentenced at 3pm Monday, October 1st before U.S. District Court Judge David M. Lawson (231 W. Lafayette Blvd, Detroit). Gerald Lee Duval Jr., 52, and his son, Jeremy Duval, 30, were raided by Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents in 2011 and charged with felony cultivation, maintaining a place to cultivate marijuana, and conspiracy to distribute. In April, the Duvals were convicted at trial, the expected result of federal laws that prohibit any medical defense or reference to state law in front of juries.
"The Duvals’ case is another tragedy from President Obama’s war on medical marijuana," said Steph Sherer, Executive Director of Americans for Safe Access (ASA), the country’s leading medical marijuana advocacy group. "This type of enforcement is completely discretionary, unnecessary and far from the public health approach that medical marijuana patients deserve." The Duvals face decades in prison despite no evidence of state law violations.
Days later, three more medical marijuana patients and caregivers will be sentenced in federal court in Michigan. Around the same time federal agents were raiding the Duvals, officers with the Central Michigan Enforcement Team (CMET) and the Mecosta County Sheriff’s Department raided the Austin Township home and other property of John Marcinkewciz, 42, and Shelley Waldron, 42. Marcinkewciz, Waldron and Jaycob Montague, 26, were originally charged under state law with cultivation and conspiracy to cultivate, but prosecutors soon turned their cases over to the federal Justice Department, where the three had no chance of defending themselves against federal law. Marcinkewciz, Waldron and Montague all subsequently took plea bargains in May.
Waldron and Montague are scheduled to be sentenced at 8:45am on October 4th before Judge Robert Bell in U.S. District Court at 110 Michigan Street NW, Grand Rapids. Marcinkewciz is scheduled to be sentenced at 8:45am on October 5th before the same judge. In spite of the plea bargains, the three medical marijuana providers still face decades in prison.
"The federal raids and prosecutions in Michigan are unfortunately only an example of the broader aggressive campaign by the Obama Administration to undermine state medical marijuana laws," continued Sherer. As with the Duval raid, DEA agents commonly burst onto the scene wearing full body armor and wielding machine guns in a clear attempt to intimidate. Despite claims by the president that he was "not going to be using Justice Department resources to try to circumvent state laws," Obama’s Justice Department has conducted more than 200 SWAT-style raids and indicted well over 70 medical marijuana patients and providers since he took office.
A federal lawsuit to force the DEA to reclassify marijuana for medical use will be heard by the D.C. Circuit on October 16th. The case Americans for Safe Access v. DEA is bringing the science of medical marijuana into federal court for the first time in nearly 20 years. If marijuana were reclassified, the five people being sentenced in Michigan would be entitled to a medical defense, a right they are now denied.

 

CONTINUE READING…

Women and the War on Drugs Fact Sheet

The “War on Drugs” is a War on Women Women are the fastest-growing population within the prison industrial complex Between 1986 and 1999, the incarceration rate for women in prison for drug offenses grew by 888%. From 1986 (the year mandatory minimum sentencing was enacted) to 1996, the number of women in federal prison for drug crimes increased from 2,400 to 24,000. This unprecedented rise is a direct result of the “war on drugs,” which has been the main factor in the overall increase in the imprisonment of women. Since 1986, the overall number of women in prison increased by 400%. For women of color, the rise is 800%.
The “war on drugs” replaced judicial discretion in sentencing with harsh mandatory minimums and over-policing in poor, predominantly African-American and Hispanic neighborhoods. Policing that targets inner-city neighborhoods as the primary method for addressing the drug problem generates arrests of drug users and small-time dealers, filling the prisons, but does very little to curb the drug trade. In the 1980’s, amid the media frenzy over the “crack epidemic,” women, especially pregnant women and women of color, became the target of punitive law enforcement efforts. Unsupported and misleading information on the consequences of prenatal exposure to cocaine received widespread media coverage and lawmakers began introducing legislative proposals addressing the subject. Since then, eighteen states have amended their civil child welfare laws to specifically address the subject of a woman’s drug use during pregnancy, ranging from an evaluation of parenting ability to the basis for presuming neglect and terminating parental rights and referral to child welfare authorities to prosecution. In some states, including South Carolina, New Mexico, Arizona, Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Missouri, North Dakota and New Hampshire, pregnant women found to be using illicit drugs have been prosecuted as child abusers and sentenced to
up to ten years in jail. In several cases, drug addicts who have given birth to stillborn babies and submitted to a drug test with positive results have been prosecuted for murder. No one wants pregnant women to use drugs, but treating it as a punishable offense will only deter pregnant addicts from seeking pre-natal care or addiction treatment. Women of color, in particular, have been targeted for punishment, as these policies are enforced in a blatantly racist manner. In Charleston, South Carolina, for example, a 2001 study concluded that the local public hospital selectively drug tested pregnant women who met the hospital’s criteria to have drug abuse problems, reported positive tests to the police, and had the women arrested (often within minutes of giving birth)and delivered to jail. 29 of the 30 women prosecuted under this policy were black. Women are the least violent segment of the prison population- roughly 85% of women in prison are serving time for nonviolent offenses. The U.S. Government’s response to the global drug trade has been an increase of interdiction efforts and greater presence of border patrol. As a result, drug traffickers have become more calculating in their methods of trafficking. The individuals least likely to be suspected of trafficking are women, particularly women with small children. Although many women are involved in trafficking for the same reasons as their male counterparts, other women are involved because they are unable to find legal or sustainable means to support their families, or are coerced into transporting drugs under threat of violence or death. These women are subject to criminal sanctions that far outweigh their roles in drug trafficking. Many have no previous criminal record. Because the “war on drugs” is fought on low-level drug dealers and drug users instead of the cartels that control the drug trade, women often serve harsher sentences for drug offenses because they cannot provide prosecutors with information to trade for reduced sentencing. Since women, as drug couriers, are often the “mules” in the hierarchal drug trade, they rarely possess information that allows them to benefit from reducing sentencing provisions. Drug addiction must be treated as a health issue, not a legal problem. Many of the women in prison for drug offenses will never recover. They will not have the means to seek treatment for their addictions, recover their children from the state’s custody, or support themselves financially. Their chances of overdose, disease, and homelessness will dramatically increase.

Women and the War on Drugs Fact Sheet.pdfDownload ·

This was a working “HEMP” Farm that was a mile away from my home in Louisville KY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AGRICULTURE AT FARMINGTON IN THE 1810-1840 PERIOD

The Farmington Hemp Farm in Louisville, Kentucky

  • Farmington was a 550-acre hemp plantation. Hemp was the principal cash crop, but not the only one. No Kentucky plantations were single crop operations. Diversified farming was the norm. One reason for this was the drastically fluctuating price for hemp sales.
  • Tobacco was grown at Farmington in some years. By 1840, vinegar, and possibly cider, produced from what must have been a fairly large orchard, were also sold.
  • Butter was produced in large enough quantities for it to be sold at the downtown Louisville market. Butter making was Lucy Speed’s responsibility. In 1840 Farmington had a herd of 17 ‘milch cows.’
  • Other seed crops at Farmington in 1840 included corn and timothy and clover hay. Wheat had also been grown at one point.
  • Crops grown for consumption at Farmington in 1840 included corn, Irish potatoes, apples, cabbages, peas and beans, and sugar beets. Raspberries and peaches were also mentioned in letters. Probably a wide variety of fruits and vegetables were grown in smaller quantities for seasonal consumption by the Speed family.
  • Livestock and fowl for consumption included pigs, cattle, turkey, chickens, and ducks.
  • Large quantities of potatoes, cabbages, sugar beets, and salted pork listed in the inventory suggest that these constituted the main portion of the diet for enslaved African Americans at Farmington. (This correlates with T.W. Bullitt’s account of the slave diet at Oxmoor.)
  • Agricultural outbuildings thought to have existed at Farmington include a hemp house (no doubt a brick or stone building), corn cribs, and probably several barns.

HEMP FARMING IN KENTUCKY AND AT FARMINGTON

  • Hemp was introduced into Kentucky with the earliest settlers. By the early 19th century it had become a significant cash crop with production centered in the Bluegrass and with large amounts also grown in Shelby, Mason and Jefferson counties. These areas had the richest soil, which was needed for high yields.
  • Hemp farming was extremely labor intensive, requiring extensive amounts of backbreaking work. Hemp, as it was produced in Kentucky, was dependent on a slave economy.
  • Kentucky’s 19th-century hemp crop was used to produce cordage and rough bagging for the baling of the cotton crop in the deep south. Kentucky’s dew-rotted hemp was of inferior quality, could never compete with imported water-rotted hemp, and was unsuccessful for marine uses.
  • The price of hemp fluctuated wildly making it difficult to rely on. ($330/ton in 1810; $60/ton in 1822; $180/ton in 1936; $80/ton in 1837)
  • Hemp production in Kentucky began to decline dramatically during and after the Civil War. Union forces prevented its river transport and demand was reduced because of reduced cotton production. After the war, new methods of baling cotton using iron bands became prevalent. Also, the end of slavery made finding an adequate labor force difficult.
  • From the 1870s through World War II hemp was grown in small quantities in Kentucky with several surges in production prompted by various short-lived demands. During this time Kentucky production was overtaken by hemp grown in Wisconsin where mechanized harvesting had been introduced. In Kentucky, methods of growing and harvesting hemp never changed from those developed in the early 19th century when John Speed was growing hemp.
  • Increasing concerns over the use of hemp for marijuana production led to a government prohibition on its production.

GROWING AND HARVESTING HEMP 

  • Hemp was planted in mid-April through May in well prepared soil that had been plowed, harrowed and rolled. The growing season was 100 to 120 days.
  • Hemp grown for seed was treated differently from hemp grown for the fibers or "lint."
  • Seed hemp was planted first in the very richest soil. Seeds were planted in hills and seedlings were thinned as they grew to about 8"high. They were thinned again as the male plants were identified, with most male plants being removed, leaving only a few for pollination. Often the tops of the female plants were lopped off to create branching and the production of more seed.
  • Plants were usually ready for harvesting in early September when they were carefully cut down near the ground with hemp hooks and dried. The seed was collected by flailing the stalks on a clean sheet. The chaff was then either blown away or separated from the seed by sifting. The seed was stored for the next year’s plants.
  • Fiber hemp was planted later and seeded more thickly. Stalks grew very tall and close together, thereby preventing the growth of many weeds, causing lower leaves to die off, and creating longer lengths of the desirable fibers. These plants grew 6′ to 10′ high. These plants, also, were cut down with hemp hooks.
  • Fiber hemp was left lying in the fields for "dew rotting" so that the gums that caused the fibers in the stalks to adhere to the outer casing would dissolve. After enough rotting had occurred, the stalks were gathered into stacks to dry them out and to await the breaking process that usually began shortly after Christmas.
  • So-called "hemp breaks" were dragged out in the fields to the stacks, where handfuls of the stalks were repeatedly bashed between the two parts of the break to shatter the outer casing and reveal the desired fibers. Initial cleaning was accomplished by whipping the fibers against the break to knock out remaining bits of the stalk (herds). The fibers were bundled in the field and weighed back at the hemp house. Later they were run through a "hackle," similar to a large and rougher looking carder, to further clean and align the fibers.
  • The fibers or "lint" were spun into a rough yarn and then either twisted into rope or woven on a simple hand loom into very rough cloth referred to as "bagging."
  • All these tasks were performed by enslaved African Americans who worked on their owner’s plantation or were leased for hemp production. The work was grueling, back-breaking labor, made more unpleasant by the dust and pollen stirred up as the hemp was processed. Many of the hemp workers were reported to have developed awful coughs that took months to go away.
  • Traditionally in Kentucky, hemp harvesting was assigned as task work to the enslaved African Americans. There were daily quotas for the amount of harvesting to be done and the amount of lint to be processed at the break. These varied depending on the age of the workers. Above and beyond the required amount, slaves were paid a small amount for extra production.
  • The Hemp Crop at Farmington in 1840

The 1840 inventory provides a number of clues about hemp production at Farmington at the time John Speed died.

  • Approximately 90 acres were used for the hemp crop that year, 87 for producing the fiber hemp and about another 3 for growing seed hemp (calculated by Otteson based on the quantity of seed listed).
  • The two sheets for cleaning hemp seed document the use of the typical method of obtaining the seed.
  • The 20 hemp hooks and 21 hemp breaks suggest that about 20 hands were employed in the production of hemp at Farmington.
  • References in the settlement of John Speed’s estate document the presence of a rope walk and weaving house at Farmington where the hemp was processed for sale. The "jack screw" in the inventory is probably the piece of equipment used at the end of the rope walk to twist the strands of hemp into rope. Why no looms are listed in the inventory is somewhat confusing.
  • In 1840, $9,154 was made at Farmington from the sale of hemp products.

PLEASE CONTINUE TO THE “EDISON HOUSE” SITE THRU THIS LINK…

OIG releases an audit of DEA adoptive seizure process and equitable sharing requests. On September 27, 2012, in Drug War, federal, states, by Scott Alexander Meiner

 

image

 

The Department of Justice’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) released an audit of Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) adoptive seizure process and equitable sharing requests. A couple of quick notes:

1.) Of instances involving federal adoption of assets seized, 65% of reported samples [41 of the 63 examined samples] required DEA headquarter approval to adopt the seizure because the instance lacked all of the following criteria:

  1. the seizure was based on a federal or state judicial seizure warrant;
  2. an arrest was made for a felony violation of the Controlled Substances Act or an equivalent state felony charge that would be a felony if pursued under federal law; and/or
  3. drugs or other contraband associated with a federal felony drug offense were also confiscated at the time of seizure.

2.) The OIG report notes “for the period of October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2011, the DEA and other federal agencies processed over 150,644 seized assets valued at about $9.2 billion of which $5.5 billion (60 percent) originated from seizures processed by the DEA and $3.7 billion (40 percent) originated from seizures processed by other federal agencies.” [Another $522 million in DEA seizured assets was noted but omitted from analysis for a lack of equitable sharing requests.]

3.) The OIG report features a disturbing trend line and reproduces a misguided–but revealing–definition of forfeiture:

The DOJ Criminal Division defines forfeiture as “the taking of property derived from a crime, involved in a crime, or that which makes a crime easier to commit or harder to detect without compensating the owner.”

THIS LINK TO PDF PUBLICATION

THIS LINK TO WEBSITE

OIG releases an audit of DEA adoptive seizure process and equitable sharing requests. On September 27, 2012, in Drug War, federal, states, by Scott Alexander Meiner

 

image

 

The Department of Justice’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) released an audit of Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) adoptive seizure process and equitable sharing requests. A couple of quick notes:

1.) Of instances involving federal adoption of assets seized, 65% of reported samples [41 of the 63 examined samples] required DEA headquarter approval to adopt the seizure because the instance lacked all of the following criteria:

  1. the seizure was based on a federal or state judicial seizure warrant;
  2. an arrest was made for a felony violation of the Controlled Substances Act or an equivalent state felony charge that would be a felony if pursued under federal law; and/or
  3. drugs or other contraband associated with a federal felony drug offense were also confiscated at the time of seizure.

2.) The OIG report notes “for the period of October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2011, the DEA and other federal agencies processed over 150,644 seized assets valued at about $9.2 billion of which $5.5 billion (60 percent) originated from seizures processed by the DEA and $3.7 billion (40 percent) originated from seizures processed by other federal agencies.” [Another $522 million in DEA seizured assets was noted but omitted from analysis for a lack of equitable sharing requests.]

3.) The OIG report features a disturbing trend line and reproduces a misguided–but revealing–definition of forfeiture:

The DOJ Criminal Division defines forfeiture as “the taking of property derived from a crime, involved in a crime, or that which makes a crime easier to commit or harder to detect without compensating the owner.”

THIS LINK TO PDF PUBLICATION

THIS LINK TO WEBSITE

Address to the United Nations General Assembly

 

By Washington Post Staff, Tuesday, September 25, 9:35 AM

Remarks of President Barack Obama

Address to the United Nations General Assembly

September 25, 2012

OBAMA: Mr. President, Mr. Secretary General, fellow delegates, ladies and gentlemen, I would like to begin today by telling you about an American named Chris Stevens. Chris was born in a town called Grass Valley, California, the son of a lawyer and a musician. As a young man, Chris joined the Peace Corps and taught English in Morocco, and he came to love and respect the people of North Africa and the Middle East. He would carry that commitment throughout his life.

OBAMA: As a diplomat, he worked from Egypt to Syria, from Saudi Arabia to Libya. He was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked, tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking Arabic, listening with a broad smile.

Chris went to Benghazi in the early days of the Libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. As America’s representative, he helped the Libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all Libyans would be respected.

And after the revolution, he supported the birth of a new democracy, as Libyans held elections, and built new institutions, and began to move forward after decades of dictatorship.

Chris Stevens loved his work. He took pride in the country he served, and he saw dignity in the people that he met.

Two weeks ago, he travelled to Benghazi to review plans to establish a new cultural center and modernize a hospital. That’s when America’s compound came under attack. Along with three of his colleagues, Chris was killed in the city that he helped to save. He was 52 years old.

I tell you this story because Chris Stevens embodied the best of America. Like his fellow Foreign Service officers, he built bridges across oceans and cultures, and was deeply invested in the international cooperation that the United Nations represents.

He acted with humility, but he also stood up for a set of principles: a belief that individuals should be free to determine their own destiny, and live with liberty, dignity, justice and opportunity.

OBAMA: The attacks on the civilians in Benghazi were attacks on America. We are grateful for the assistance we received from the Libyan government and from the Libyan people. There should be no doubt that we will be relentless in tracking down the killers and bringing them to justice.

And I also appreciate that in recent days the leaders of other countries in the region — including Egypt, Tunisia, and Yemen — have taken steps to secure our diplomatic facilities and called for calm, and so have religious authorities around the globe.

But understand, the attacks of the last two weeks are not simply an assault on America. They’re also an assault on the very ideals upon which the United Nations was founded: the notion that people can resolve their differences peacefully, that diplomacy can take the place of war, that in an interdependent world all of us have a stake in working towards greater opportunity and security for our citizens.

TO ALL THOSE WHO BELIEVE THAT TOTAL REPEAL OF PROHIBITION IS IMPOSSIBLE… I SAY

By:  Rev. Mary Thomas-Spears

 

 

 

APPARENTLY YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND LAW OR YOUR CONSTITUTION

NOR DO YOU UNDERSTAND THAT, NOTHING IS AS IT APPEARS TO BE

MOST THOUGHT IT WAS IMPOSSIBLE… FOR ME TO BEAT 6 FELONIES FOR TRAFFICKING IN A CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE, WHEN I NEVER DENIED MY GUILT. THOUGH I WAS CONVICTED OF ONE FELONY IN THAT CASE… I MADE U.S. LEGAL HISTORY FOR BEING THE ONLY DRUG TRAFFICKING FELON TO NEVER SERVE ANY SIGNIFICANT TIME ON A SENTENCE, WHILE I FLUNKED EVERY DRUG TEST GIVEN BY THE COURTS FOR THC.

MOST THOUGHT IT IMPOSSIBLE…  FOR ME OR ANY ONE TO SET OUT TO DECRIM THIS PLANT HERE IN KENTUCKY 20 YRS AGO…

YET, TODAY, IT IS A TICKET-ABLE OFFENSE UP TO 8 OZ’S OR 4 PLANTS AND THEY NOW OFFER A TAX STAMP FOR ANY QUANTITY OVER THAT AMOUNT {NOT THAT I SEE THE TAX AS A GOOD THING, YET, THEY MUST FIRST RECOGNIZE SOMETHING AS LEGAL TO REGULATE IN ORDER TO TAX IT.}

STILL UNCONSTITUTIONAL WHEN IT COMES TO MY PERSONAL RIGHT TO UTILIZE OR GROW

MOST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE IMPOSSIBLE… FOR ME OR US {EVEN THOSE FEW OF US WHO TOOK ON THE TASK, KNEW THE ODDS WEREN’T IN OUR FAVOR} TO GET THE WORD OUT ABOUT THE "LEGALIZE = LEGAL LIES" AND HOW THEY USE IT TO GAIN CONTROL OVER THE PLANT TO GMO… THAT WE’D BEEN BASICALLY LEAD BY THE NOSE… AND FEEDING THE MONSTER… HELL THEY NEVER THOUGHT WE’D GET THE WORD OUT ABOUT GMO HEMP/CANNABIS/MARIJUANA [.]

TODAY THERE ARE ENTIRE ORGANIZATIONS SET UP IN OTHER AREAS IN THE COUNTRY TO WATCH FOR GMO CANNABIS/MARIJUANA/HEMP AND TO CERTIFY PRODUCTS GMO FREE…

HELL I THOUGHT I WAS FIGHTING A LOOSING BATTLE FOR A MINUTE WHEN… I TRIED TO SHOW THIS SAME INFORMATION TO  GATEWOOD GALBRAITH FREEDOM FIGHTER AND DEFENDER OF THE CONSTITUTION AND THE PEOPLE HERE IN KENTUCKY… AND HE SCREAMED AT ME, WHEN I CAME TO HIM WITH THIS ISSUE, RESEARCH AND INFO. NEARLY 7 YRS AGO, AT WHICH POINT HE TOLD ME, "LEAVE IT ALONE MARY!!! LEAVE THAT ISSUE IN CALI!!!…"

SO I DID, AND SO I SUGGESTED TO RON K., WE SHOULD TAKE THE INFO TO JACK HERER WHO WE BOTH KNEW… SO THEN RON KICZENSKI AND MYSELF, TOOK THE INFO WE HAD GATHERED TO JACK HERER {RON LIVING NEAR HIM, WHILE I ONLY SPOKE WITH HIM BY PHONE AND E-MAILS..} AND ASKED HIM TO EXAMINE IT AND NOT TO BELIEVE US, BUT TO DO HIS OWN RESEARCH AND IF HE AGREED WITH US TO REWRITE CALI’S LAWS, WITH A NEW INITIATIVE, THAT WOULD END PROHIBITION THROUGH REPEAL AND PROTECT THE PLANT FROM GMO MUTATION AND SO HE DID. AFTER WHICH, HE WROTE THE JACK HERER INITIATIVE NOW DUBBED CCHHI2012, WHICH WE {RON AND MYSELF} HELPED HIM TO WORD AND WHICH IS CURRENTLY GATHERING SIGNATURES FOR THE BALLOT IN CALI TODAY.

AN INITIATIVE WHICH WE HAD PLANNED ALL ALONG TO PIT, AGAINST ANY OTHER LEGALIZATION LEGISLATION AND THEN CAME PROP. 19, SO WE DID WHAT WE HAD PLANNED… AND AGAIN, WHAT MOST EVERYONE SAID WAS IMPOSSIBLE… AND WE STOPPED PROP. 19 {WHICH WOULD HAVE LEGALIZED CANNABIS FOR EVERYONE AND HAD MUCH SUPPORT THERE IN CALI… } FROM PASSING JUST IN THE NICK OF TIME IN MY OPINION TO SAVE THE PLANT AND THE PEOPLE FROM THE CORPORATIONS AND GOVERNMENTS COMPLETE OWNERSHIP AND CONTROL.

AT WHICH POINT MY HERO, MY ATTORNEY, MY MENTOR, MY FRIEND,… GATEWOOD GALBRAITH, WHO COULD NOT HEAR ME WHEN I SAID IT TO HIM… AND SCREAMED AT ME TO LET IT GO THEN WROTE ON ANOTHER WEBSITE ON THIS ISSUE,

Gatewood said…

I am an out-of-state observer who may have a hand in writing the future marijuana laws of Kentucky.

I immediately felt great hope when I first heard about the "legalization" forthcoming in Nov. in

California but when I heard that my good friends Jack Herer and Dennis Peron opposed its

passage, I was greatly intrigued. Now I thoroughly understand their positions. Thanks for your

exhaustive effort. I can sympathize with having such a burden lifted. Gatewood Galbraith

July 15, 2010 7:06 AM

IN RESPONSE TO, "WHY PRO-POT ACTIVISTS OPPOSE PROP. 19: 19 REASONS TO VOTE KNOW"

http://votetaxcannabis2010.blogspot.com/2010/07/why-pro-pot-activists-oppose-2010-tax.html

HELL THE DOCTORS HAVE BEEN TELLING ME I AM FIGHTING A LOOSING BATTLE FOR MANY YRS… YET, I AM STILL HERE AND WALKING, WHEN THEY SAID, I WOULDN’T BE.

SO………

I KNOW THAT NOTHING IS, AS IT APPEARS TO BE…

AND THAT DESPITE HOW THINGS MIGHT APPEAR… NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE WHEN IT COMES TO THIS ISSUE OR MOVEMENT.

AND IT ONLY TAKES A FEW OF COMMITTED PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE TRUTH.

"PROTECT THE PLANT THAT PROTECTS THE PEOPLE"

CHANGE YOUR LEGISLATION TO READ "NO GMO’S" AND RETURN IT UNTAXED TO OUR GARDENS TODAY!

SO I WILL CONTINUE IN MY EXHAUSTIVE EFFORTS, FOR ALL THOSE WHO WRITE TO ASK ME? WHY I HAVEN’T STUCK A GUN IN MY MOUTH YET OR WHY I HAVEN’T REALIZED THAT I AM FIGHTING A LOOSING BATTLE THAT GOES AGAINST THE TIDE.

There stood the real Mitt Romney naked before the Electorate!

For All To See

9/22/2012 8:51 AM EDT Tags: Romney, Republicans, 47%, politics

As the procession moved down the street, one of the children pointed and shouted, “He has no clothes on!”, and suddenly the spell was broken. There stood the real Mitt Romney naked before the Electorate!

Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney, in a glaringly honest bit of speechifying, bared his soul and revealed his true self and that of his wealthy supporters. The opinion Mr. Romney and his supporters hold of their fellow citizens is one of resentment and indignation that those on the low end of the financial spectrum should get the assistance of the Government to be successful or to just get by. That somehow wealth equals good people and poor equals bad, dependent and lazy people. Never mind the fact that almost all successful citizens have had the help of either their families or the Government in the creation of their success. There is even a video of Mr. Romney’s mother saying that Mitt’s father was grateful for the assistance he received from the Government when he first returned from Mexico.

Mr. Romney claimed that 47% of Americans pay no income tax. That these citizens are dependent on Government handouts, lazy and feel that things like food and housing are entitlements. Statistics show that of those in the 46.4% of the citizens Mr. Romney and his supporters disparage, 28.3% pay payroll taxes and of the 18.1% who pay no payroll taxes, 10.3% are elderly or Veterans and 6.9% are non elderly but make less than 20,000 dollars a year. None of these citizens make enough money to pay income taxes. They do pay plenty in State, sales and local taxes but I guess these don’t count! As bad as all this is for the Romney Campaign and for the rest of America’s opinion of the wealthy there is a greater lesson to be learned for Americans living in the lower end of the financial pyramid.

The Republican Party in it’s current form is a wholly owned subsidiary of the wealthy elite and as such , the views of the leader of the Party are the views of the Party. Americans in the despised 47% who have traditionally voted Republican need to wake up and realize that this is not the Republican Party of Ronald Reagan anymore. This Republican Party could care less about you and yours, unless of course you make enough to pay Federal income taxes. All this Party wants is your vote. They will use any social issue they can to include religion to con you out of your vote. Mr. Romney’s utterances at his $50,000 a plate fundraiser are exactly how these wealthy people feel and are the same as that of the Republican Party. As much as one might feel traditional loyalty to the Republican Party the fact that remains is this; if you make less than $200,000 a year and vote Republican you are not only voting for people who don’t like you , but are voting against your own financial interests. The Party has abandoned you and will not represent you even if you vote for them. Why would you want to vote for them anyway?

CONTINUE TO MSGT. THOMAS VANCE’S BLOG ON CINCINNATI.COM…..