The State vs. Joshua E.Mason (TN) (Please help this family in Tennessee)

 

PLEASE HELP OUR FAMILY
I am facing 15 years in prison away from my young daughter and family for growing cannabis in TN
. I am asking for HELP in defending myself in court against these charges.

To make a long and exhausting story short, I was growing cannabis and a friend betrayed me and turned me into law enforcement. I use cannabis as a medicine for a variety of ailments.

I also helped other people who were in need of quality cannabis medicines. When we were raided we had a small amount of flowering plants and cutting for other patients who

wanted to grow their own medicine.

Upon learning of my medical garden law enforcement stormed my home while our family slept. They violently stormed our home with assault rifles drawn and held me face down

in a puddle of dog urine after they literally scared the pee out of my dog. My child was present and was subject to watching the entire episode. It is an unnecessary military tactic

that was used to intimidate and scare our family that will stay with my daughter forever.

Law enforcement continued to search for “guns and bombs” but they found nothing more than a well-kept medical cannabis garden, which I showed them voluntarily after they stated they had a warrant to search the premises (I was never shown a warrant). They found nothing beyond cannabis in their search of the premises.

 
I was released on a $39,000 bond and informed I did not qualify for a public defender. I was told to return with counsel. I was able to put a $1,000 payment down on an attorney. Upon returning to court I was informed that a public defender was now willing to speak to me. A female public defender took me in a room and informed me that the DA was willing to offer me a $500 fine and probation. I was ecstatic and immediately informed them I would take the offer.

In a bizarre twist, upon learning I had retained other counsel, the public defender tore up the deal in front of me and stated, “Oh…I see you have a lawyer. This deal is no good.” I was crushed.
My attorney was able to get me a deal for $4,000 and if I cannot pay it the state will press forward with charges. To add insult to industry, I received a $54,000 fine from the TN department of revenue for unpaid taxes on the cannabis I grew.

I am asking for money to pay my fine and keep me with my family, so I can continue to look for work. I appreciate any and all help you can afford, to help me avoid prison for cannabis. I am a hard-working family man who looks forward to putting this past me and moving on to the next chapter of my life.

Thanks for your time and consideration.
Regards, Josh Mason and Family

ps.the deal was .donate $4000+ to the drug fund and get a misdemeanor and a $500 fine.don’t donate $4000+ and they will revoke my bond put me in jail and try me for the max 15 years

 

The State vs. Joshua E.Mason (TN) (Please help this family in Tennessee)

 

PLEASE HELP OUR FAMILY
I am facing 15 years in prison away from my young daughter and family for growing cannabis in TN
. I am asking for HELP in defending myself in court against these charges.

To make a long and exhausting story short, I was growing cannabis and a friend betrayed me and turned me into law enforcement. I use cannabis as a medicine for a variety of ailments.

I also helped other people who were in need of quality cannabis medicines. When we were raided we had a small amount of flowering plants and cutting for other patients who

wanted to grow their own medicine.

Upon learning of my medical garden law enforcement stormed my home while our family slept. They violently stormed our home with assault rifles drawn and held me face down

in a puddle of dog urine after they literally scared the pee out of my dog. My child was present and was subject to watching the entire episode. It is an unnecessary military tactic

that was used to intimidate and scare our family that will stay with my daughter forever.

Law enforcement continued to search for “guns and bombs” but they found nothing more than a well-kept medical cannabis garden, which I showed them voluntarily after they stated they had a warrant to search the premises (I was never shown a warrant). They found nothing beyond cannabis in their search of the premises.

 
I was released on a $39,000 bond and informed I did not qualify for a public defender. I was told to return with counsel. I was able to put a $1,000 payment down on an attorney. Upon returning to court I was informed that a public defender was now willing to speak to me. A female public defender took me in a room and informed me that the DA was willing to offer me a $500 fine and probation. I was ecstatic and immediately informed them I would take the offer.

In a bizarre twist, upon learning I had retained other counsel, the public defender tore up the deal in front of me and stated, “Oh…I see you have a lawyer. This deal is no good.” I was crushed.
My attorney was able to get me a deal for $4,000 and if I cannot pay it the state will press forward with charges. To add insult to industry, I received a $54,000 fine from the TN department of revenue for unpaid taxes on the cannabis I grew.

I am asking for money to pay my fine and keep me with my family, so I can continue to look for work. I appreciate any and all help you can afford, to help me avoid prison for cannabis. I am a hard-working family man who looks forward to putting this past me and moving on to the next chapter of my life.

Thanks for your time and consideration.
Regards, Josh Mason and Family

ps.the deal was .donate $4000+ to the drug fund and get a misdemeanor and a $500 fine.don’t donate $4000+ and they will revoke my bond put me in jail and try me for the max 15 years

 

From Bootlegging to Pot Trafficking

 

 

The outlaws of Marion County, Kentucky, defy one Prohibition after another.

Mike Riggs | July 13, 2012

The Cornbread Mafia: A Homegrown Syndicate’s Code of Silence and the Biggest Marijuana Bust in American History, by James Higdon,

When the United States lost the Philippines to Japan in December 1941, it also lost its sole supplier of industrial hemp, which the U.S. Navy used for rope. With the Pacific no longer fit for agriculture, the United States turned to nine states to grow hemp for the war effort. Of those nine states, the government picked Kentucky to cultivate the ideal hemp seed. And not just any part of Kentucky: It picked the state’s most militantly anti-authoritarian region, Marion County.

When alcohol was prohibited, Marion County had been a hub for black market booze. Federal agents shut down a different distillery nearly every week and stationed armed guards to watch over the casks of liquor that had already been made. (The liquor itself wasn’t illegal, only its production, sale, and transportation.) Con artists and mobsters came regularly to Marion, where they either bribed guards or stole the booze outright. The night the feds put a convicted Al Capone on the Dixie Flier to ship him from Chicago to a penitentiary in Atlanta, the distillers of Marion County waited with their children alongside the train tracks to say goodbye to the man who had kept them housed and fed during Prohibition.

So it was fitting that the government turned to Marion to grow hemp in 1941. Forty-nine years later, 70 descendants of the county’s starving bootleggers would be arraigned in federal court under the RICO Act and charged with organizing the largest marijuana trafficking ring in U.S. history. The operation spread across 10 states, and had produced 182 tons of grade-A marijuana. Investigative journalist James Higdon tells their story in The Cornbread Mafia.

The man behind the enterprise was Johnny Boone. Born in neighboring Washington County, Boone was an agricultural whiz kid who won awards from the state 4-H program for the tobacco he grew as a teenager. By the time he reached young adulthood, he was a regular in Marion County saloons. Returning Vietnam vets exposed Boone to weed. While some locals were initially skittish about smoking herb, especially considering the condition of soldiers returning from the war zone, Boone loved it. By the mid-1970s, he was growing gourmet kush in the land of Maker’s Mark bourbon.

Boone would eventually serve 15 years in federal prison, from 1988 to 2003. Shortly after his release, he was found to be growing yet again; he is currently on the run.

Higdon’s treatment of Boone and what law enforcement agencies came to refer to as the Cornbread Mafia is charitable, on par with Steven Ambrose’s glowing and factually confused history of the industrial titans who built the Pacific Railroad or Richard Wolffe’s hagiography of Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign. Except the Cornbread Mafia aren’t considered heroes by many people outside Marion County. Higdon’s book attempts to rectify that. The story of the pot growers and their bootlegging forefathers, he writes, is the story of "free spirits exercising their free will in the free market, the philosophical children of John Stuart Mill, maximizing their liberty with the least possible harm to others while at work in Rousseau’s natural state, which happens to be the Commonwealth of Kentucky."

Higdon is not without a dog in the fight. He is a child of Kentucky himself, and thanks to his access to Boone he became the first journalist to be subpoenaed by the Obama administration’s Department of Justice. His portrait of Marion County and its bootleggers, past and present, is a welcome rebuttal to horror stories about cocaine cowboys, the Wonderland Murders, and the Medellin cartel. Not all drug dealers are vile or malicious, and the ones who are certainly aren’t vile or malicious simply because they’re selling drugs.

Still, there are times I found myself recoiling at his attempts to excuse the lawbreaking done by Boone and his men. Charlie Stiles, a bootlegger and thief, is the county’s de facto leader—more so even than the mayor of Lebanon, the county seat. For Higdon, he’s one of the good bad guys: When he does bad things, he does them for Marion County. Like when he steals a semi truck full of window air conditioners and sells them to the Catholic hospital in Lebanon for a tenth of their value. Or when a local boy is seen doing donuts in the parking lot of the Catholic Church, and Stiles maims him with a shotgun to teach a lesson. (All the lessons in Marion are hard ones.) Likewise Boone, who succeeded Stiles as Marion County’s Robin Hood when Stiles was ambushed and shot to death by police in 1971, is, in Higdon’s telling, a good bad guy. Even though, in 1980, Boone and another Marion County grower nearly killed a Lebanon police officer, supposedly in retaliation for the police-led beating death of a Lebanon saloon owner six years earlier. Even Higdon’s suspicion that the real reason Boone attacked the cops was to distract them from the trucks hauling that year’s crop out of Marion does not tarnish Boone in his eyes.

Higdon’s portrayal of the growers in Marion County is exceptional not just for its charity but for its nuance. The county was originally settled by Catholics in the 18th century, and Higdon explains how the region’s Catholicism allowed distillers and pot farmers to distinguish between man’s law and God’s law. That distinction allowed for gambling and boozing, but not prostitution; violence against lawmen when they invited it, but never against the church regardless of how much the rector complained about criminal activity.

Absent from Cornbread Mafia is the handwringing and tearjerking that has come to define modern drug reporting. While Higdon spares no detail about the violence, corruption, and social instability that accompanies the growth of shadow economies, this is not a story about drug addiction. It is a story, Higdon writes, "of guns and piles of ammunition left unfired, of buckets of emeralds used as currency in Belize, of marijuana seeds smuggled from Afghanistan." That, and "generosity, of brotherhood, of criminals carrying Christmas presents through the snow."

Mike Riggs is an associate editor of Reason magazine.

CONTINUE READING…

Illinois cannabis patients cannot be discriminated against by employers

 

 

Blueberry Gum2

 

On December 10th the National Law Review

published an article written by Vedder Price in which

they give some clarification of the Illinois Medical

Marijuana Law.

On august 1, 2013 Governor Pat Quinn signed the

“Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot

Program Act”.

One of the most disturbing provisions to me is the

fact that a patient CANNOT grow their own medicine. 

It must be dispensed (and paid for) at a legally

licensed dispensary.

However, one good thing that is included in the

“Act” was in regards to an employment related

issue. Under the “Act” it would be unlawful to

discriminate against an employee or applicant based

upon their medical cannabis use, provided is legally

prescribed and obtained.

It would seem that legalization has opened up doors

in all commerce ventures across the country and

worldwide.  The problem is the legalization itself has

opened up a whole new door for criminalization.

As the product of “Cannabis” is patented, grown,

produced, sold and exchanged over the stock

market all around the world, the doors of the new

prisons will be opening for those of us who might

not choose to abide by their “growing standards”.

Each state law is markedly different and continuously

changing amid the stress of a newly marketed item. 

But the bottom line is legalization equals regulation

and taxation which we are seeing now amid the

hustle and bustle of the “legalizing states”.

There will indeed be much money to be made. 

Jobs will be created.  People will have access to

Cannabis – IF deemed necessary by thier doctor,

and the “law”.

Just like the opiate wars which we are living in every

day, which would include all Pharmaceutical Opiates

which are marketed through Pharmacy’s and

regulated by law therefore creating a black market

for them by law of supply and demand (via

addiction), so will the war on Cannabis continue,

long after it is “legal”.  The only difference is that the

Cannabis is not addictive like other opiates and that

is and will continue to be the saving factor in this

rude scenario of “legalization”.

Below are some links of information on the legalization process.

 

HALF BAKED:  THE FEDERAL AND STATE CONFLICTS OF LEGALIZING MEDICAL MARIJUANA  (2012)

THE NATIONAL LAW REVIEW (2013)

FINDLAW.COM

This Day In History: December 7, 1941

PICTURE THIS! 1941 PICTURES OF PEARL HARBOR

ATTACK ON PEARL HARBOR

RADIO BROADCASTS FROM DECEMBER 7, 1941

For some reason, I NEVER forget when the Seventh Day of December comes around each year.

December 7, 1941 sticks to my memory like glue.

I may not know what the date is on any other given day of the year, but I sure know when it is December 7th.

I had not yet even been born, but my Father had been 24 years earlier and was about to get the ultimate education of his life.

With the bombing of Pearl Harbor came not only the deaths of the thousands which lost their lives on that fateful day in the Harbor, but the start of a war which would virtually never end and cost many more thousands of Servicemen to lose their lives in Countries all over the world of which many had never even heard of until they ended up in boats on the shores of those countries.

On October 10, 1941 Kenneth E. Hardesty was inducted into the Army where he served as a PFC in the 389th Air Service Squadron until January 2, 1946.  He was my Father.

Attack at Pearl Harbor, 1941

Some of Kentucky’s Pearl Harbor survivors plan to meet Friday

Published: December 6, 2012

By Jim Warren — [email protected]

Traveling isn’t easy when you’re in your 90s, but some survivors of Pearl Harbor say they will gather in Lexington once more on Friday to mark the 71st anniversary of the attack that drew America into World War II.

Vaughn Drake of Lexington and Jon Toy of Mount Sterling, both 94, said they’ll attend the Pearl Harbor Commemorative Association’s annual Pearl Harbor Day luncheon Friday, and they expect that fellow survivor Herman Horn, 92, of Frankfort will be there too.

Friday’s luncheon will include ceremonies to honor Pearl Harbor survivors and others who served during World War II.

The keynote speaker will be historian Thomas R. Emerson, a former assistant Kentucky attorney general.

Gov. Steve Beshear has issued a proclamation designating Dec. 7, 2012, as Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day in Kentucky.

The commemorative buffet luncheon in Lexington will be held at noon Friday at the Oleika Shrine Temple, 326 Southland Drive.

Drake, Horn and Toy were young men when Japanese planes swooped down over Pearl Harbor, on the island of Oahu in Hawaii, on the fateful morning of Dec. 7, 1941. Now, they are among a dwindling few witnesses of that history-making moment who are alive to tell younger generations about it.

Drake said he apparently is the last Pearl Harbor survivor living in Lexington.

Toy, who heads the Kentucky Chapter of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association, said there are only 10 survivors on the chapter’s membership list. There were 15 a year ago.

“There are a few others still out there that we don’t know about because they never joined the chapter,” Toy said. “But a lot of us have gone. We’re becoming part of history.”

Toy said the chapter once had more than 150 members. Chapter members continue to meet each year in the spring and fall, but it’s becoming more and more difficult for them to travel, he said.

The national Pearl Harbor Survivors Association disbanded on Dec. 31, 2011, after the 70th Pearl Harbor anniversary observance. Association officials said members simply were too old and too few to continue. Local chapters, such as the one in Kentucky, are free to carry on as long as they have members, but without the support of a national organization.

Eventually, Toy said, it will be up to the sons and daughters of survivors to carry on.

Vaughn Drake was a U.S. Army engineer at a camp on Oahu when the Japanese attacked 71 years ago Friday. One enemy plane, hit by gunfire, crashed near where Drake was standing, and he later recovered a small piece of the wreckage, which he still has.

“We couldn’t believe it, even though it was happening right in front of our eyes,” Drake said in a 1991 interview.

Horn and some other soldiers jumped into a truck that morning and headed for a distant anti-aircraft battery, planning to use its gun against the attacking planes. On the way, they had to stop repeatedly and take cover when Japanese fighters strafed them.

“We didn’t fire one shot. … We were very, very lucky,” Horn said in an interview a few years ago.

Jim Warren: (859) 231-3255.

Read more here