Malnourished Veteran Pleads For Help From VA

By: Kayla VanoverEmail

Kayla Vanover

BOWLING GREEN, Ky (WBKO) An Army veteran, living right here in Bowling Green, is being denied full benefits while suffering from a surgery that he says was performed in error.

Frank Coursey has not eaten solid food in nearly three years. As if this is not enough strain on his body, he goes to bed each night worried about the future of his family, if something were to happen to him.

"This picture is on 07-07-2007. I was 286 pounds. This picture was Father’s Day of this year," said Frank Coursey, veteran.

Frank Coursey is currently 133 pounds, losing on average five pounds per week. His weight loss is the result of a gastric bypass surgery performed by a doctor in West Virginia, whom he was referred to by a his local VA physician.

Coursey says immediately following his surgery, he knew something did not feel right.

"Dr. Canterbury was there with about eight or nine students discussing the operations of the job and all that. I remember him looking at me and saying this is the worst case scenario of this surgery that we’ve had," said Frank Coursey, veteran.

Months into his recovery, Coursey claims his nausea never ceased. The same West Virginia VA hospital repeatedly told him he was experiencing typical side effects from the surgery. Coursey says he visited local emergency rooms weekly.

"I would go in a coma state and have to be hooked back up to IV’s. The doctor looked at me and said, why did you receive this surgery again? You didn’t need it," said Frank Coursey, veteran.

Coursey eventually had one VA doctor agree to put him back on the surgery table for an examination.

"His first words were, my God they didn’t tell me it was this bad," said Frank Coursey, veteran.

After the doctor ballooned his stomach, Coursey claims his vomiting continued. Even then, the doctor sent him on is way, claiming it was simply and irritation of his esophagus.

After exhausting all regional VA outlets suggested to him, Coursey finally found a Nashville doctor who agreed to see him.

"The doctor said, the man who performed your surgery did a rookie mistake. He put the staples to close. The staples aren’t wide enough, that is why you’re not holding solid food," said Frank Coursey, veteran.

The doctor assured Coursey he could perform a corrective surgery, but the business manager said it was not possible until they received their payment from the VA. Coursey already expected this to be paid, prior to the appointment.

Three months later, the doctor contacted Coursey to perform it, knowing the intentions of the VAs payment. However, Coursey experienced yet another issue.

"He had a hernia at the top of his esophagus. It already pulled half the sleeve up in it. from all the puking and coughing and everything," said Kathy Coursey, spouse.

Due to the hernia growing since the last appointment, the doctor could not perform the surgery without approval from the VA.

Since this appointment, Coursey has undergone surgery on his neck as well. Due to being malnurished, his head is too heavy for his brittle bones to hold it up.

Once he has fully recovered from his neck surgery, Coursey is scheduled to receive his corrective bariatric surgery.

Through all of this, Frank Coursey’s major concern is the well being of his family.

Coursey says the chances of him surviving his upcoming surgery are limited and he still is not receiving full VA benefits to cover his medical bills.

He says if something does not change, his biggest fear is not living through the surgery. He fears his family becoming homeless, due to a current lien placed on his home by an unpaid medical bill.

Coursey has contacted local political offices, but is told it will be at least 30 days before his case is even reviewed.

 

CONTINUE TO STORY AND VIDEO!


Louisville Gas & Electric (LG&E) has been illegally pouring toxic coal ash into the Ohio River,

Earthjustice

Liked · May 29 · Edited

 

BRAZEN: For years, Louisville Gas & Electric (LG&E) has been illegally pouring toxic coal ash into the Ohio River, unbeknownst to neighboring communities. Now thanks to a hidden camera and satellite imagery, the utility has been caught and faces a lawsuit from Earthjustice along with huge fines. http://ow.ly/xoDMp
LG&E could be fined up to $68 million along with $37.5K for each day that goes forward until the dumping is stopped. Coal ash contains a toxic brew of pollutants, including mercury and arsenic, which can cause cancer. It’s the waste product left over from the nation’s coal-fired power plants. Here’s great information on coal ash >> http://ow.ly/xoOp4
Help SPREAD this post and TELL US >> Do you think the fines are harsh enough for LG&E’s years of illegal dumping?

 

Recreating 1918-19 Spanish Influenza: New Influenza Pandemic Danger?

June 27, 2014 by Paul Dunne

Spanish influenza patient attended by masked hospital staff, US Naval Hospital New Orleans, Louisiana, USA autumn 1918. Photograph courtesy of US Naval History and Heritage Command.

Professor Yoshihiro Kawaoka and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison successfully reconstituted a virus 97% similar to the Spanish Flu of 1918-19, partly from fragments of avian viruses. Does this research put us all at risk?

The Great Pandemic

According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services article, “The Great Pandemic,” the Spanish Flu killed an estimated 40 to 100 million people in the immediate aftermath of World War One.

In response, Simon Wain-Hobson, a virologist at Paris’ l’Institut Pasteur, described how this research renders the avian viruses H5N1 and H7N9, which currently circulate in Asia, more readily transmissible to mammals and argues that this research ensures that the world is now a potentially a more dangerous place.

Researchers have known the genetic sequence of Spanish Influenza H5N1 since 1997 primarily due to research carried out on the tissues of the victims of the 1918 pandemic by Jeffrey Taubenberger at the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

The Presence of Avian Viruses Facilitated the Reconstitution of 1918 H1N1 Influenza Virus

Professor Yoshihiro Kawaoka maintains there is sufficient strain in the current avian viruses to naturally reconstitute the famous H1N1 of 1918. Professor Kawaoka found eight sequences in currently-circulating avian viruses to recreate the H1N1 influenza virus. He then tested the virulence of the reconstituted virus and found it is 1,000 times less infective than the flu of 1918.

The LD50 measure (i.e. the number of virus particles required to kill 50% of test mice) required 100,000 virus particles. Laboratory animals proved more susceptible and the virus more transmissible due to their closer, more confined living conditions. Fortunately, Oseltamvir (Tamiflu) offers robust protection against newly-created viruses.

Spanish Flu virus

Newly-Created Viruses Could Lead to Seasonal Deaths

Simon Wain-Hobson of l’Institut Pasteur asked about ‘the chances of eight viral segments reuniting in nature?‘ Kawaoka could not respond.

If this occurred, this combination could possibly result in 250,000 – 500,000 deaths as per seasonal influenza. In “Do We Need to Fear Influenza, Again,” Patrick Berche of L’Hopital Neckar in Paris asserts the level of security for these newly-created viruses was P3 and was not maximal security.

During the last two decades of research at least a dozen accidental escapes from laboratories at level P4 security have occurred.

Research into Dangerous Viruses Make No Provision for the Safety of Human Lives

Kawaoka countered Berche’s warning when he insisted he used antiviral safeguards and he warned public health officials in case of a pandemic risk. Kawaoka further insisted his own vigorous security precautions in his laboratories were adequate to reduce chances of the newly-created pandemic flu virus escaping.

Fouchier’s Ferrets

Kawaoka research could be less of a threat than other risky experiments. The research community feared problems after the recent revelation that Ron Fouchier rendered the Avian Virus H5N1 more transmissible between ferrets.

The creation of this ‘supervirus’ led to a temporary moratorium on this type of research. At the end of 2013, 56 scientific establishments combined to interdict these extreme experiments, without success.

Viruses and The Future

There are documented and verifiable occasions worldwide in which scientists work on these types of substances and compounds where there is no accountability, potentially resulting in a lethal pandemic which threatens humankind.

The scientific community must hold Professor Kawaoka, and others studying such volatile research, accountable for laboratory conditions and the safety of the public.

Decoded Everything is a non-profit corporation, dependent on donations from readers like you. Donate now, and keep the great information coming!

CONTINUE READING this important article!…

Kentucky sees decrease in farms; experts point to a variety of contributing factors

By Greg Kocher:  [email protected] :   June 28, 2014

Kentucky has dramatically fewer farms and much less land devoted to farming, according to the latest snapshot by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Between 2007 and 2012, the Bluegrass State had the greatest percentage decrease in farmland of any state in the country, the Census of Agriculture says.

Farmland — which the government counts as privately owned or leased cropland, pastures and woodlands — declined in Kentucky by 943,000 acres, or 6.7 percent.

That’s an area larger than the combined acreage of Daniel Boone National Forest in Eastern Kentucky (707,000 acres) and Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area in Western Kentucky (170,000 acres).

Other states with the largest percentage declines in farmland were Alaska (5.4 percent), Georgia (5.2 percent), Mississippi (4.6 percent) and Wisconsin (4.1 percent).

The number of farms in Kentucky also declined, from 85,260 in 2007 to 77,064 in 2012.

These numbers are contained in the 2012 Census of Agriculture that USDA released in May. The census is conducted every five years to record a snapshot of business activity on farms, but it doesn’t track how much land was lost to development. Nor does it tell what happened to other land in the decline that wasn’t developed.

However, estimates from the latest National Resources Inventory — a nationwide survey of non-federal land conducted by USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service — shows that development in Kentucky claimed 41,000 acres of the state’s rural land base between 2007 and 2010.

These are figures that Kentuckians should watch, said Jennifer Dempsey, director of the American Farmland Trust’s Information Center. The trust is a leading conservation organization dedicated to farmland protection; it plans to hold a national conference in Lexington in October.

"There’s a growing demand among consumers for locally grown products," Dempsey said, "and if at the same time you have a significant decline in your land in farms, I would say that’s a problem. You’ve lost almost 944,000 acres almost in one clip. That’s pretty significant."

Dempsey later acknowledged that "lost" is a stronger verb than necessary, because it suggests a permanency that isn’t really there. Farmland acreage fluctuates from census to census — some years it goes up and some years it goes down — depending on the demand for food and the productivity of agriculture.

But the general trend nationwide and statewide over time is that fewer acres are devoted to farms, said David Knopf, regional director of the National Agricultural Statistics Service office in Louisville. The service is the agency that conducts the census and distributes its results.

"Within any given year, you could have someone in (farming) one year and out the next," Knopf said. "It tends to be the relatively small farms, either in size or in the value of sales, who report in one census that they are a farm and they report in the next census that they’re not a farm."

(A farm is defined by the government as "any place that produced and sold, or normally would produce and sell, $1,000 or more of agricultural products during the census year.")

For example, one operation may raise livestock and have 100 acres in one census, "so they get counted as a farm," Knopf said. "Well, in the next census, they’re not raising any livestock and so there goes 100 acres of land in one farm. So it goes like that from one census to the next."

There is more land that could be put back into production than is going into development over a five-year period. Knopf said. For this reason, Knopf takes the view that the decline in Kentucky farmland is something to watch, but not something to be overly concerned about.

"To sound alarms because we have dropped 6 percent of our farmland, that I don’t find startling," Knopf said. "Let’s see what happens in the next five years."

How did it decrease?

It should be noted that many sources interviewed for this story were skeptical of the figures on farmland decrease. The statistics service says it checks its information against other known data, and have staff in each state to review it as well.

Kentucky probably saw a decline because some land was unproductive and some was intentionally rotated out of production, Daniel Smaldone, a spokesman for Kentucky Farm Bureau, wrote in an email.

"Arable farming acreage lost to residential, industrial and economic development are the pieces we should be most concerned about as they are acres permanently removed from the total land available to grow crops and raise livestock," Smaldone wrote.

John-Mark Hack of Versailles has another theory about where some of those 943,000 acres went. Hack is executive director of the Local Food Association, a national trade association that works to improve market share and market access to buyers and sellers of local food. He suspects that much of Kentucky’s farm acreage is idle and is not being used to grow anything —so it dropped off the radar of the census.

"It’s a lingering aftereffect of the demise of the tobacco program that no one has taken notice of," Hack said. "My perception is that we have a tremendous asset in productive farmland in Kentucky that is being underutilized."

The federal tobacco-quota program ended in 2004. Buyout payments to farmers were started under a 2004 law that ended Depression-era tobacco quotas and were to be made annually for 10 years. The last of those payments will be made this fall.

"That happened to coincide with the exit of a relatively large percentage of our farm population due to age and retirement," Hack said. "So there were a number of people who literally took the money and retired, and they may still hold their land, but they’re not actively farming it."

David Appelman, extension agent for agriculture in Bracken County in Northern Kentucky, can see some validity to this theory.

"We have lost operating farms because there’s no longer anyone to do the work," Appelman said. "With the loss of the tobacco program, those farms are sitting idle. … Without tenant farmers and an older farm ownership with no children to take over, there’s an inability to do the work. They can’t maintain the fences, harvest the hay."

Jessamine County beef farmer Dan Shearer said he sees farms sitting idle, too, "which is not good because it’s out of production. … People took the buyout money and retired and are using their money for something else other than upkeep on the farm.

"When they pass away, their heirs don’t seem to want to farm, and probably most of them couldn’t if they wanted to because they don’t know how," Shearer said.

Others question Hack’s theory. Michelle Simon, Scott County’s extension agent for agriculture, said she doesn’t see much idle land. Grain farmers in that county "are picking up as much acreage as they can. And I’ve seen a lot of people rolling hay on places that I haven’t before now," Simon said.

As for the generational shift, Simon said many younger farmers who have tried to get into beef-cattle farming are getting out because the costs are too high for them to get started.

"The older farmers — who you would expect to be the ones who are retiring, who are in their 60s and 70s — are the ones that are sticking it out and staying in," Simon said. "People in their 50s and 60s are expanding more now."

Woodford County hay farmer Larry Johnson falls into this category. Johnson, 65, grew up on a farm in Marion County, pursued a 37-year career with IBM and Lexmark in Lexington, then retired in 2004 to devote time to his first love — farming. He grows hay just south of Versailles and sells it to area horse farms. When Johnson added 33 neighboring acres this year to his existing 22, his accountant shook his head.

"He said, ‘And some people play golf,’" Johnson recalled. "I said, ‘Tom, I’m not some people. I’m just different.’"

Once he fixes some fences, Johnson plans to put beef cattle on his expanded acreage. His youngest son has indicated some interest in farming, but Johnson doesn’t see many others planning to join him.

"You don’t find many young kids any more that have any interest in staying with the farm and fighting it — and it’s a fight every day," Johnson said. "You fight the rain, you fight disease, you fight insects every day."

Nationwide and statewide, agriculture is about to see a huge transfer of assets, said Adam Probst, Woodford County extension agent for agriculture. The principal operators of Kentucky farms are getting older. The average age was 53.4 in 1997; in 2012 it was 57.6. Estimates are that up to 70 percent of all farmland in the nation will change hands by 2025.

"There aren’t that many new farmers, and we’ve got the oldest generation of farmers we’ve ever had," Probst said.

As Hack sees it, Kentucky must be "very deliberative" about its agricultural future.

"Do we embrace our agrarian heritage and societal movement to high-quality food and return the land to its highest and best purpose?" he said. "Or do we surrender it permanently to development that really has a pretty short time frame associated with it? It’s a really important question that needs to be more thoroughly discussed."

Greg Kocher: (859) 231-3305. Twitter: @HLpublicsafety

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/06/28/3314513/kentucky-sees-decrease-in-farms.html#storylink=cpy

Facebook Manipulated 689,003 Users’ Emotions For Science

June 29: Updated with statement from Facebook.

Facebook is the best human research lab ever. There’s no need to get experiment participants to sign pesky consent forms as they’ve already agreed to the site’s data use policy. A team of Facebook data scientists are constantly coming up with new ways to study human behavior through the social network. When the team releases papers about what it’s learned from us, we often learn surprising things about Facebook — such as the fact that it can keep track of the status updates we never actually post. Facebook has played around with manipulating people before — getting 60,000 to rock the vote in 2012 that theoretically wouldn’t have otherwise — but a recent study shows Facebook playing a whole new level of mind gamery with its guinea pigs users. As first noted by Animal New York, Facebook’s data scientists manipulated the News Feeds of 689,003 users, removing either all of the positive posts or all of the negative posts to see how it affected their moods. If there was a week in January 2012 where you were only seeing photos of dead dogs or incredibly cute babies, you may have been part of the study. Now that the experiment is public, people’s mood about the study itself would best be described as “disturbed.”

The researchers, led by data scientist Adam Kramer, found that emotions were contagious. “When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred,” according to the paper published by the Facebook research team in the PNAS. “These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks.”

The experiment ran for a week — January 11–18, 2012 — during which the hundreds of thousands of Facebook users unknowingly participating may have felt either happier or more depressed than usual, as they saw either more of their friends posting ’15 Photos That Restore Our Faith In Humanity’ articles or despondent status updates about losing jobs, getting screwed over by X airline, and already failing to live up to New Year’s resolutions. “*Probably* nobody was driven to suicide,” tweeted one professor linking to the study, adding a “#jokingnotjoking” hashtag.

The researchers — who may not have been thinking about the optics of a “Facebook emotionally manipulates users” study — jauntily note that the study undermines people who claim that looking at our friends’ good lives on Facebook makes us feel depressed. “The fact that people were more emotionally positive in response to positive emotion updates from their friends stands in contrast to theories that suggest viewing positive posts by friends on Facebook may somehow affect us negatively,” they write.

They also note that when they took all of the emotional posts out of a person’s News Feed, that person became “less expressive,” i.e. wrote less status updates. So prepare to have Facebook curate your feed with the most emotional of your friends’ posts if they feel you’re not posting often enough.

So is it okay for Facebook to play mind games with us for science? It’s a cool finding but manipulating unknowing users’ emotional states to get there puts Facebook’s big toe on that creepy line. Facebook’s data use policy — that I’m sure you’ve all read — says  Facebookers’ information will be used “for internal operations, including troubleshooting, data analysis, testing, research and service improvement,” making all users potential experiment subjects. And users know that Facebook’s mysterious algorithms control what they see in their News Feed. But it may come as a surprise to users to see those two things combined like this. When universities conduct studies on people, they have to run them by an ethics board first to get approval — ethics boards that were created because scientists were getting too creepy in their experiments, getting subjects to think they were shocking someone to death in order to study obedience and letting men live with syphilis for study purposes. A 2012 profile of the Facebook data team noted, “ Unlike academic social scientists, Facebook’s employees have a short path from an idea to an experiment on hundreds of millions of people.” This study was partially funded by a government body — the Army Research Office — and via @ZLeeily, the PNAS editor on the article says this study did pass muster with an Institutional Review Board, but we’ll see if it passes muster with users.

In it’s initial response to the controversy around the study — a statement sent to me late Saturday night — Facebook doesn’t seem to really get what people are upset about, focusing on privacy and data use rather than the ethics of emotional manipulation and whether Facebook’s TOS lives up to the definition of “informed consent” usually required for academic studies like this. “This research was conducted for a single week in 2012 and none of the data used was associated with a specific person’s Facebook account,” says a Facebook spokesperson. “We do research to improve our services and to make the content people see on Facebook as relevant and engaging as possible. A big part of this is understanding how people respond to different types of content, whether it’s positive or negative in tone, news from friends, or information from pages they follow. We carefully consider what research we do and have a strong internal review process. There is no unnecessary collection of people’s data in connection with these research initiatives and all data is stored securely.”

Ideally, Facebook would have a consent process for willing study participants: a box to check somewhere saying you’re okay with being subjected to the occasional random psychological experiment that Facebook’s data team cooks up in the name of science. As opposed to the commonplace psychological manipulation cooked up advertisers trying to sell you stuff.

CONTINUE READING….

Facebook Manipulated 689,003 Users’ Emotions For Science

June 29: Updated with statement from Facebook.

Facebook is the best human research lab ever. There’s no need to get experiment participants to sign pesky consent forms as they’ve already agreed to the site’s data use policy. A team of Facebook data scientists are constantly coming up with new ways to study human behavior through the social network. When the team releases papers about what it’s learned from us, we often learn surprising things about Facebook — such as the fact that it can keep track of the status updates we never actually post. Facebook has played around with manipulating people before — getting 60,000 to rock the vote in 2012 that theoretically wouldn’t have otherwise — but a recent study shows Facebook playing a whole new level of mind gamery with its guinea pigs users. As first noted by Animal New York, Facebook’s data scientists manipulated the News Feeds of 689,003 users, removing either all of the positive posts or all of the negative posts to see how it affected their moods. If there was a week in January 2012 where you were only seeing photos of dead dogs or incredibly cute babies, you may have been part of the study. Now that the experiment is public, people’s mood about the study itself would best be described as “disturbed.”

The researchers, led by data scientist Adam Kramer, found that emotions were contagious. “When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred,” according to the paper published by the Facebook research team in the PNAS. “These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks.”

The experiment ran for a week — January 11–18, 2012 — during which the hundreds of thousands of Facebook users unknowingly participating may have felt either happier or more depressed than usual, as they saw either more of their friends posting ’15 Photos That Restore Our Faith In Humanity’ articles or despondent status updates about losing jobs, getting screwed over by X airline, and already failing to live up to New Year’s resolutions. “*Probably* nobody was driven to suicide,” tweeted one professor linking to the study, adding a “#jokingnotjoking” hashtag.

The researchers — who may not have been thinking about the optics of a “Facebook emotionally manipulates users” study — jauntily note that the study undermines people who claim that looking at our friends’ good lives on Facebook makes us feel depressed. “The fact that people were more emotionally positive in response to positive emotion updates from their friends stands in contrast to theories that suggest viewing positive posts by friends on Facebook may somehow affect us negatively,” they write.

They also note that when they took all of the emotional posts out of a person’s News Feed, that person became “less expressive,” i.e. wrote less status updates. So prepare to have Facebook curate your feed with the most emotional of your friends’ posts if they feel you’re not posting often enough.

So is it okay for Facebook to play mind games with us for science? It’s a cool finding but manipulating unknowing users’ emotional states to get there puts Facebook’s big toe on that creepy line. Facebook’s data use policy — that I’m sure you’ve all read — says  Facebookers’ information will be used “for internal operations, including troubleshooting, data analysis, testing, research and service improvement,” making all users potential experiment subjects. And users know that Facebook’s mysterious algorithms control what they see in their News Feed. But it may come as a surprise to users to see those two things combined like this. When universities conduct studies on people, they have to run them by an ethics board first to get approval — ethics boards that were created because scientists were getting too creepy in their experiments, getting subjects to think they were shocking someone to death in order to study obedience and letting men live with syphilis for study purposes. A 2012 profile of the Facebook data team noted, “ Unlike academic social scientists, Facebook’s employees have a short path from an idea to an experiment on hundreds of millions of people.” This study was partially funded by a government body — the Army Research Office — and via @ZLeeily, the PNAS editor on the article says this study did pass muster with an Institutional Review Board, but we’ll see if it passes muster with users.

In it’s initial response to the controversy around the study — a statement sent to me late Saturday night — Facebook doesn’t seem to really get what people are upset about, focusing on privacy and data use rather than the ethics of emotional manipulation and whether Facebook’s TOS lives up to the definition of “informed consent” usually required for academic studies like this. “This research was conducted for a single week in 2012 and none of the data used was associated with a specific person’s Facebook account,” says a Facebook spokesperson. “We do research to improve our services and to make the content people see on Facebook as relevant and engaging as possible. A big part of this is understanding how people respond to different types of content, whether it’s positive or negative in tone, news from friends, or information from pages they follow. We carefully consider what research we do and have a strong internal review process. There is no unnecessary collection of people’s data in connection with these research initiatives and all data is stored securely.”

Ideally, Facebook would have a consent process for willing study participants: a box to check somewhere saying you’re okay with being subjected to the occasional random psychological experiment that Facebook’s data team cooks up in the name of science. As opposed to the commonplace psychological manipulation cooked up advertisers trying to sell you stuff.

CONTINUE READING….

Drug War Chronicle, Issue #840 (short version)

Subject: Drug War Chronicle, Issue #840 (short version)

a publication of StoptheDrugWar.org Issue #840 – 6/27/14
Subscriptions | Archives | Speakeasy Blog | Chronicle main page | Donate StoptheDrugWar.org/chronicle

TABLE OF CONTENTS

support-dont-punish-2014-pictures-200px_0.jpg
worldwide protests against the drug war

1. WORLDWIDE PROTESTS SET FOR UN ANTI-DRUGS DAY THIS THURSDAY [FEATURE]
The UN’s annual anti-drug day is Thursday, but this year, it is going to be met by a counter-campaign calling for drug decriminalization, harm reduction, and human rights in the drug war. "Support, Don’t Punish" protests are being held in 80 cities worldwide. Is yours one?

2. COPS NEED WARRANTS TO SEARCH CELL PHONES, SUPREME COURT RULES
In a landmark ruling for privacy rights, a unanimous Supreme Court has held that police may not search the contents of cell phones and other hand-held devices "incident to arrest." Instead, they must get a warrant.

3. MEDICAL MARIJUANA UPDATE
A Senate companion to the successful House DEA defunding amendment has been filed, New York becomes the 23rd medical marijuana state, a CBD bill is moving in North Carolina, Rhode Island retrenches, and more.

4. MEDICAL MARIJUANA PASSES IN NEW YORK
After last-minute compromises between legislators and Gov. Cuomo, the legislature has approved a medical marijuana bill, and Cuomo says he will sign it. But it’s more restrictive than patients and advocates would have liked.

5. THIS WEEK’S CORRUPT COPS STORIES
Last week may have been slow on the police corruption front, but we make up for it this week. A Washington SWAT team member goes bad, an NYPD officer pays for going bad, a former Colorado sheriff also pays a price, an Arkansas cop gets nailed for protecting what he thought were dope loads, and, of course, more jail and prison guards get in trouble.

6. CHRONICLE AM — JUNE 19, 2014
We can watch the marijuana policy landscape shift before our eyes, with legalization initiatives and decrim measures popping up around the country and even Oklahoma Republicans arguing over legalization. There is also action on the opiate front, the Senate will vote on defunding the DEA’s war on medical marijuana in states where it is legal, and more.

7. CHRONICLE AM — JUNE 20, 2014
Two killer narcs face consequences for their actions, New York is set to become the 23rd medical marijuana state, the Pope comments on drug policy, prohibition-related violence flares in Mexico and Peru, and more.

8. CHRONICLE AM — JUNE 24, 2014
Your fearless reporter has been traveling, so our schedule is a little off, but the drug policy news continues. Paul Stanford calls it quits in Oregon, pot shops are coming within days in Washington, an Alabama drug task needs to reconsider its priorities (or maybe the people funding it need to reconsider theirs), and more.

9. CHRONICLE AM — JUNE 26, 2014
It’s UN anti-drug day, and protests to mark it are going on in at least 80 cities around the world, House Republicans move to block DC decrim, the Oregon legalization initiative looks set to make the ballot, the ACLU has a strong new report out on SWAT teams, and more.