H.R.2936 – Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017

PLEASE BE AWARE OF THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION!

We received confirmation that a full floor vote on H.R. 2936, the so-called Resilient Federal Forests Act, will take place on Wednesday or Thursday.  The bill is sponsored by Representative Bruce Westerman of Arkansas, who’s largest campaign donor is the timber industry. The bill radically changes how our public national forests are managed, elevating logging above all other uses and cutting the public out of the management process.
Please call your Representative in Congress and ask them to VOTE NO on H.R. 2936. Find your Representative here.    SOURCE

H.R. 2936–A bill to expedite under the National Environmental Policy
Act of 1969 and improve forest management activities on National
Forest System lands, on public lands under the jurisdiction of the
Bureau of Land Management, and on Tribal lands to return
resilience to overgrown, fire-prone forested lands, and for other
purposes; to the Committee on Agriculture, and in addition to the
Committees on Natural Resources, Education and the Workforce, and
Transportation and Infrastructure, for a period to be subsequently
determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such
provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee
concerned.   SOURCE

The so-called “Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017” (H.R. 2936) is a stunning setback to our public lands. It is one of the most extreme attacks we’ve ever seen on our national forests and many of the bedrock laws that protect our public lands, wildlife and the fabric of our democracy.  A more appropriate name for this bill, which passed the House Natural Resources Committee in late June, would be the “Massive Gift to the Timber Industry at All Costs Act of 2017”.  SOURCE

Take Action:  This bill would clear-cut our national forests and silence your voice…SIGN PETITION THRU THIS LINK!

https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2936/history

https://secure.earthjustice.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=1980

http://mailchi.mp/7eb7036cd107/calls-needed-now-voice-your-opposition-to-the-westerman-bill?e=[UNIQID]

(KY) Representative To File Bill Allowing Counties To Decide On Marijuana Legalization


 
(LEX 18) A press release from the campaign manager for Representative Dan Johnson of Bullitt County said that he is filing a bill for the 2018 General Assembly that if passed, would allow local jurisdictions to hold local option elections to decide whether to allow marijuana growth, possession, and distribution.
“A lot of people want government to crack down on marijuana use, a lot of people want it to be available for people who have medical needs for it and a lot of people just want to be left alone to use it when they want to,” Rep. Johnson (R-Bullitt County) said. “We need a compromise that works for everyone and I think I have a pretty good idea.”
Johnson says there is a lot of disagreement about how the state should legalize marijuana or if the state should legalize marijuana. He said he believes the best solution would be to let each county decide on their own.
“The population is split on marijuana, but it’s clear that the momentum is headed toward growing and using it legally in Kentucky,” Johnson said. “This approach would allow us to have up to 120 different approaches to an issue that clearly isn’t one size fits all. Some counties won’t touch it and some will transform their economies on an agricultural product with worldwide demand.”
CONTINUE READING…

Msgt. Thomas Vance: (KY) Pot Legalization Opponents Looking Desperate

(From Msgt. Thomas Tony Vance via Facebook comes the following opinion)

Thomas Tony Vance's Profile Photo, Image may contain: 1 person

There was a Kentucky Assembly Joint Interim hearing of the Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection Committee held on 12 October 2017. There was short notice of the hearing and the main topic was cannabis legalization as it relates to Public Protection. All of the scheduled speakers were members of organizations that oppose cannabis legalization. Among cannabis activists it was being called the ‘anti-legalization’ hearing.
Two of the speakers were old friends who were involved in the ‘Marijuana Summit’, held in Covington on Dec 1, 2015. Mr. Coder of Smart Approaches to Marijuana and Mr. Shemelya of the National Marijuana Initiative both spoke at the December ‘Summit”. That forum was billed as a neutral look at the issue but was clearly an anti-legalization entity.
The speakers at Thursday’s hearing were Mr. Coder and Mr. Shemelya, Rick Sanders of the Kentucky State Police and Van Ingram of the Kentucky office of Drug Control Policy.
Mr. Shemelya spoke mainly of recreational legalization and how the higher potency of today’s cannabis products are a danger because we don’t understand it. After speaking about DUID, driving under the influence of drugs, he tried to blame marijuana for an increase in fatal traffic accidents, 2 seconds later, he quickly mentioned that fatal traffic accidents are actually down. Then it was back to potency and saving the children. Since cannabis would be legal only for adults over 21 this seems to be a moot point.
Mr. Ingram of the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy, was next and began by claiming we do not know what will happen if cannabis is legalized like tobacco. However with 20 years of citizen access in California, none of the reported claims of doom and gloom having materialized there puts his claim in serious doubt.
Mr. Coder began by wondering what effect cannabis legalization would have on employers and the economy. Stating that employers are having to change their drug screens or they will not be able to find workers etc. One wonders why cannabis would not be treated as any other commodity and problems worked out in the Assembly and the courts.
Lastly Commissioner Rick Sanders of the Kentucky State Police spoke. He went on about adult use and proceeded to repeat all the tired old claims of the negatives of legalization. Next he proceeded to list the bodies. Deaths from opioids, 52,000, from alcohol, 88,000 and tobacco 48,000 but he stopped there. No mention of cannabis deaths! Twenty-two years of citizen access since California passed medical legalization in 1996 should surely yield some deaths if it is as harmful as the speakers claim.
The discussion ended with various Legislators comments and a resolution to support and pursue research into the medical benefits of cannabis. Observers posited that the speakers looked a little desperate and it reminded me of what Mr. Shemelya said at the ‘Marijuana Summit’. He said that if California passes recreational legalization in November of 2016, which they did, then, “it’s all over folks!”

SOURCE

“…the riskiest pot is coming from the black market—which could be an argument for expanding legalization”

Marijuana: Why Dangerously Potent Pot Is Making People Lose Their Minds and Memories

Homegrown2017

By Jessica Firger On 10/19/17 at 4:44 PM

High-potency pot is causing psychiatric issues, including addiction and memory problems. New strains of the recreational drug have higher levels of the active chemical and not enough of another compound that keeps the drug safe. And as a new study this week documents, the riskiest pot is coming from the black market—which could be an argument for expanding legalization. 

The new report, published this week by Manchester Metropolitan University in the U.K., tested 50 samples of cannabis in the city of Manchester. The study was conducted by Volteface, a London-based policy think tank seeking reform for marijuana laws to improve safety of the drug by making it legal, and thus limiting demand on the local black market. All of the samples had high levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of the drug that produces the “high,” and inconsequential amounts of cannabidiols (CBDs), the protective compound of the drug that prevents marijuana from becoming unsafe.

Pot that is high in THC carries a greater risk of psychiatric problems, including psychosis, addiction and memory impairment. One study, for example, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry evaluated cannabis use in 280 people and compared them to a control group of 174 non-cannabis users. The study found that people who experienced their first psychotic episode were more likely to have used a higher THC potency form of the drug.

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

Amir Englund, an expert in cannabinoid psychopharmacology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King’s College London, tells Newsweek that the low levels of CBDs exacerbate the issues caused by high levels of THC. Additionally, frequent users often become tolerant to cannabis and slowly need a stronger product to get as high as they used to, he says.

“Because both THC and CBD are made from the same material in the plant, more of one means less of the other,” he says. Some recent research, he says, has shown that people using strains of marijuana that are also high in CBD—not just THC—are less likely to have mental health problems than those who opt for strains that have low CBD but high THC content. Some experiments he’s conducted show that CBD can counter the negative effects of high doses of THC in healthy volunteers.

Growers, he says, are cross-breeding plants to favor THC production over CBD. But the decision isn’t influenced only by the market’s demand. In many instances, it’s determined by the grower’s bottom line. “Some of the reasons why these varieties are more popular include the fact that they are more cost-effective to produce (more total drug-yield per plant) and more popular among frequent users,” says Englund.

A number of other factors also affect the potency of pot. According to Leafly, there will always be some variation when multiple growers cultivate the same strain because environment, growing technique and genetics all impact the composition of the plants.

A report published in 2015 by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment found the problem isn’t only with illegal sales. Labeling on regulated cannabis is often misleading, and the strain purchased could have higher or lower levels of potency than the label leads a consumer to believe.

“High THC, low CBD cannabis dominates the UK’s illicit market as it has a rapid growth period up to maturity and can be grown indoors,” the researchers write. “This enables those selling cannabis to make the greatest profit and presents the lowest risk. While popularity of this product is undoubtedly high, this may well be due to the fact that no other product is easily available and consumers have neither the access to nor the experience of any alternative.”

In other words, pot purchasers should look beyond the name—as nice as Black Beauty and Northern Lights may sound—and find out more about what they’re smoking. 

CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO!

“…the riskiest pot is coming from the black market—which could be an argument for expanding legalization”

Marijuana: Why Dangerously Potent Pot Is Making People Lose Their Minds and Memories

Homegrown2017

By Jessica Firger On 10/19/17 at 4:44 PM

High-potency pot is causing psychiatric issues, including addiction and memory problems. New strains of the recreational drug have higher levels of the active chemical and not enough of another compound that keeps the drug safe. And as a new study this week documents, the riskiest pot is coming from the black market—which could be an argument for expanding legalization. 

The new report, published this week by Manchester Metropolitan University in the U.K., tested 50 samples of cannabis in the city of Manchester. The study was conducted by Volteface, a London-based policy think tank seeking reform for marijuana laws to improve safety of the drug by making it legal, and thus limiting demand on the local black market. All of the samples had high levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of the drug that produces the “high,” and inconsequential amounts of cannabidiols (CBDs), the protective compound of the drug that prevents marijuana from becoming unsafe.

Pot that is high in THC carries a greater risk of psychiatric problems, including psychosis, addiction and memory impairment. One study, for example, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry evaluated cannabis use in 280 people and compared them to a control group of 174 non-cannabis users. The study found that people who experienced their first psychotic episode were more likely to have used a higher THC potency form of the drug.

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

Amir Englund, an expert in cannabinoid psychopharmacology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King’s College London, tells Newsweek that the low levels of CBDs exacerbate the issues caused by high levels of THC. Additionally, frequent users often become tolerant to cannabis and slowly need a stronger product to get as high as they used to, he says.

“Because both THC and CBD are made from the same material in the plant, more of one means less of the other,” he says. Some recent research, he says, has shown that people using strains of marijuana that are also high in CBD—not just THC—are less likely to have mental health problems than those who opt for strains that have low CBD but high THC content. Some experiments he’s conducted show that CBD can counter the negative effects of high doses of THC in healthy volunteers.

Growers, he says, are cross-breeding plants to favor THC production over CBD. But the decision isn’t influenced only by the market’s demand. In many instances, it’s determined by the grower’s bottom line. “Some of the reasons why these varieties are more popular include the fact that they are more cost-effective to produce (more total drug-yield per plant) and more popular among frequent users,” says Englund.

A number of other factors also affect the potency of pot. According to Leafly, there will always be some variation when multiple growers cultivate the same strain because environment, growing technique and genetics all impact the composition of the plants.

A report published in 2015 by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment found the problem isn’t only with illegal sales. Labeling on regulated cannabis is often misleading, and the strain purchased could have higher or lower levels of potency than the label leads a consumer to believe.

“High THC, low CBD cannabis dominates the UK’s illicit market as it has a rapid growth period up to maturity and can be grown indoors,” the researchers write. “This enables those selling cannabis to make the greatest profit and presents the lowest risk. While popularity of this product is undoubtedly high, this may well be due to the fact that no other product is easily available and consumers have neither the access to nor the experience of any alternative.”

In other words, pot purchasers should look beyond the name—as nice as Black Beauty and Northern Lights may sound—and find out more about what they’re smoking. 

CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO!

NEVER ASSUME ANYTHING…

An update on my Daughter, Francis’s death…

Sarah Family  Happier times…

There used to be a poster hanging on the wall, outside the Kitchen at our old house.  It read,

NEVER ASSUME ANYTHING!

or

YOU WILL MAKE AN “ASS” out of “U” AND “ME”

That was the first thing that I thought of after reading the Autopsy and Toxicology Reports for Francis today.

According to Nashville, (TN) Forensic Medical Laboratory Report, there was absolutely NO “drugs of abuse” found within her system at the time of death on June 19th.

After having “assumed” the worse, I was proven wrong.  And I am so grateful that I have received this gift of being “wrong”. 

Francis was very social but very private as well.  She was well aware of her problems at hand and at least for the short term she had “gotten ahold” of herself.

Her story remains the same – Only the ending has changed.

My heart goes out to anyone who has had to live through an ordeal such as this.

smk

Sarah Tox Screen

RELATED:

…dying with Francis – and learning to live again…

The Children Left Behind…

When it comes to legalizing pot… WWBD?

Image result for LEO WEEKLY LOUISVILLE

By Erica Rucker

Kentucky, your governor is a fool. The pension crisis — among the nation’s worst — is a defining issue in Kentucky. So… WWBD? What will Gov. Matt Bevin do? What has he done? Not much.

One thing is certain: He will keep repeating the phrase “a sucker’s bet,” and do little else besides cut programs that help Kentucky’s struggling families. That’s the only idea he has. Families in Kentucky need real solutions.

If Bevin won’t do something to deal with this mess, then legislators need to take the reins and begin legalizing marijuana. It’s the wisest bet.

Marijuana is a cash crop. It could generate a potential $100-plus million boon for the Kentucky economy. Standard & Poor’s has ranked our pension fund as the worst-funded of any state, a debt that will bring down all of us. So… WWBD? Probably more of the same. Bevin and his antiquated friends are stubbornly wandering in the proverbial green road, blocking traffic.

Is the legalization of marijuana a perfect budget solution?

No, but it is working in nearly 30 other states, including Washington, D.C.

Recently, on WHAS radio’s Terry Meiners show, Bevin said this about legalizing marijuana, “You get a hundred and something million dollars worth of revenue and, yeah, that’s money, but the cost? … ”

“There are people overdosing based on ingestion of products that are edibles and things. You have that state being sued by at least two of their border states. You have law enforcement people and emergency rooms being overrun by problems. You have homelessness … spiking in that state.”

Uh, what?

Bevin’s generalizations about Colorado lack truth: The evidence shows that many early problems have been remedied by Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and the legislature.

Before saying that, Bevin laughed and said, “…A lot of toked-up people gambling, that’s the solution? Those are suckers’ bets.”

Bevin sure thinks he’s funny, but… Derby.

A lot of toked-up people are already gambling in the state, governor, and man, what a revenue boost if they could do it legally. Also, that sounds like a fucking great time, to be honest. I’d probably go to my first Derby, if that were the case.

Bevin said he will never allow marijuana legalization and that there is no support for expanded gambling.

If Derby guests could gamble during the horse races, hit a casino when the races are over, plus relax with good bud instead of the harder drugs that have killed thousands of Kentuckians, this would seem a significant win for Kentucky — win for a state already behind economically and being torn apart by opioid addiction and deaths.

Let the Bevins of Kentucky cry, “What about public safety?”

Marijuana is certainly safer than alcohol. It improves outcomes for those dealing with opioid addiction. According to the American Journal for Public Health, while there are slight increases in motor vehicle crashes in states with legal marijuana, the numbers of fatalities are unchanged. The effects of marijuana on health are infinitely milder than that of alcohol or harsh prescription medications.

In Colorado, which Bevin sees as the land of weed-laden woes — ignoring that California and 27 other states have legalized pot to some degree — there was an increase in calls to poison control and more emergency room visits from folks who’ve eaten too much or too strong of an edible and think they are dying.

No one has actually died from marijuana alone. But someone has probably died from an opioid overdose in the time it’s taken to read this.

Of course, people have thought they were dying after smoking certain strains of marijuana, but a bag of Cheetos, a nap and several doughnuts later, they’re still with us.

Gov. Hickenlooper suggests that practicing “good government” has helped take care of these early hiccups in the legalization of marijuana. Hickenlooper is still cautious but thinks that it is important for Colorado to continue to move forward with the “experiment.”

“I’d say in most circumstances, from most perspectives, our worst nightmares haven’t materialized. We haven’t seen a spike in teenage use. We haven’t seen a giant increase in people’s consumption of marijuana. Seems like the people who were using marijuana before it was legal, still are. Seems like the people who weren’t using marijuana before it was legal, still aren’t,” Hickenlooper told The Cannabist in March.

So why can’t Bevin follow this example?

For one, Bevin is not bold and, his use of social media aside, his ideas aren’t fresh. As with most carpetbaggers who sell the promises of returning to a value system that’s never existed in states they don’t really understand, Bevin is singing the same tired tunes. Trying something that seems to be working in other states, well… he can’t do that. He’s afraid of losing the Christian voters in a state where the Christians smoke too. (shhh!)

So… WWBD?

What about retooling the state narcotics statutes and legalizing marijuana to help remedy damage done by Nixon and Reagan administration’s ridiculous drug laws, which have jailed many a mother and father for using street level capitalism as a means to exist with dignity.

Bevin says that there is “no political appetite for gambling,” and it seems he feels the same about legalizing marijuana. But what does “political appetite” mean and who are these people serving, the people of Kentucky or themselves?

This isn’t a Republican or Democratic party issue. The legalization of marijuana for Kentucky should be a no-brainer. Other states see it. The people of Kentucky see it, but perhaps we need to work on the “political appetite” of our elected officials who seem to exist in an alternate universe. Elections are right around the corner. We’ve certainly got a lot in our “political appetite” that our leaders aren’t strong enough to execute. Seek new leaders? Definitely, because sticking with Bevin and his cronies certainly seems to be, as he puts it, “a sucker’s bet.”

CONTINUE READING!!!

Appeal filed in dismissal of medial marijuana lawsuit​

Image result for BESHEAR BEVIN MARIJUANA LAWSUIT

FRANKFORT, Ky. —

Plaintiffs appealed a Kentucky court ruling throwing out their lawsuit to legalize medical marijuana.

Last month, a Franklin Circuit judge dismissed the lawsuit against Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear.

While the judge acknowledged marijuana has the potential for medial use, he said it is up to the legislature to decide the issue.

In a statement an attorney for the plaintiff said, “Whether a law is constitutional is absolutely the work of the judiciary-not the legislature. Our clients have a right to use safe, effective medicine under the Kentucky constitution and the prohibition against it is not only outdated and contrary to the law, but it’s just plain wrong.”

Twenty-nine states have legalized marijuana in some way.

CONTINUE READING…

RELATED:

(KY) GOV. MATT BEVIN AND AG ANDY BESHEAR GET SUED OVER MEDICAL MARIJUANA!

Marijuana’s impact on public safety examined

October 13, 2017

For Immediate Release

Marijuana’s impact on public safety examined

FRANKFORT – As Kentucky lawmakers explore ways to pay for public employee pensions, a coalition of law enforcement groups say legalizing marijuana for recreational use isn’t the answer.

“I’m not willing to risk my grandchildren’s health to save my pension,” Kentucky State Police Commissioner Richard W. Sanders said yesterday while testifying before the Interim Joint Committee on Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection. “I don’t think that is the right way to go with this thing.”

Sanders is a 40-year law enforcement veteran with 21 years vested in the state’s hazardous duty pension.

Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy Executive Director Van Ingram testified that marijuana is harmful to society.

“Sixty years ago big tobacco downplayed the risk of tobacco,” Ingram said. “We can see where that brought us: Huge settlements and big changes to that industry. Thirty years ago big pharma told us there was no risk of addiction to opioids. We can see where that brought us: The largest drug epidemic in the nation’s history.”

He added that 10 to 15 percent of people who use marijuana develop addiction issues.

“We are getting led down another path so some folks with a lot better suits than I have can make a lot of money,” Ingram said. “We certainly got enough addiction issues in this state without bringing more to the table.”

Rep. Tom Burch, D-Louisville, however, said Prohibition gave rise to crime …”and criminalizing marijuana has done the same thing.”

National Marijuana Initiative (MMI) Director Ed Shemelya testified that marijuana is legal for recreational use in eight states. He said at least one form of marijuana is legal for medical use in more than 21 states. He said Colorado is on track to sell $1 billion worth of marijuana this year and generate roughly $200 million in tax revenue.

“That’s a lot of money,” Shemelya said. “There is no disputing that.”

But he argued that the bulk of the revenue was being spent on regulating the industry and on harm reduction.

MMI is an arm of the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program administered by the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Shemelya said the potency levels of marijuana have reached “astronomical levels” since Colorado legalized it. He said the science of what those high potency rates are doing to adolescent brains isn’t in.

A Rocky Mountain HIDTA report found, however, that Colorado youth now rank No. 1 in the nation for past month marijuana use, up from fourth place in 2011-’12 and 14th place in 2005-’06, according to the report.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) Director for State and Local Affairs Tony Coder testified that recreational marijuana is becoming a workforce development issue.

“Marijuana users in the workplace have more absenteeism, workplace injuries, more discipline problems,” he said.

SAM is a group founded by former U.S. Rep. Patrick Kennedy and former President George W. Bush speechwriter Kevin Sabet, and its primary focus is on educating the public about the harms of marijuana legalization, according to its website.

Coder said adult past-month marijuana use increased 71 percent in the three-year average since Colorado legalized recreational marijuana compared to the three-year average prior to legalization. He added that the latest 2014-’15 results show Colorado adults ranked No. 1 in the nation for past month marijuana use, up from the seventh spot in 2011-’12.

Rep. Rob Rothenburger, R-Shelbyville, asked how legalized marijuana affected Colorado’s economic growth. The panelists testified that they only had anecdotal evidence that employers were having a hard time finding workers who could pass drug screenings.

Rep. Myron Dossett, R-Pembroke, asked the panelists if workers compensation claims had increased in Colorado but they panelists said they didn’t know those figures.

— END –