(KY) SB 118–Relating to Medical Cannabis

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Thank you Senator Steve West for giving KY patients the freedom to try cannabis.  SB118 will give patients the choice to try cannabis for their condition without fear of prosecution, imprisonment, loss of parental rights…LINK

SB 118(BR-1392)(click bill number to view bill details.)

Title:  AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

Sponsor(s):

West , Stephen
Seum , Dan “Malano”
Clark , Perry B.
Thomas , Reginald
Embry Jr. , C.B.

Current Status:

introduced in Senate
In Senate

Summary:

Create new sections of KRS Chapter 218A to define terms; restrict medical cannabis to certain patients with qualifying debilitating conditions; establish requirements for cultivation, production, processing, distribution, and sale in compassion centers; establish requirements for patients, visiting patients, and caregivers; establish professional protections for practitioners; establish certain protections for cardholders; establish responsibilities for cardholders; allow restrictions on possession, possession while operating a motor vehicle, and smoking; specify that use of medical cannabis by a qualifying patient is to be treated the same as use of prescribed pharmaceutical medications; establish additional protections for medical use; specify that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the costs of use or prohibits an employer from disciplining an employee for workplace impairment; establish a medical purpose defense for some uses of medical cannabis; establish the Department for Medical Cannabis Administration to enforce the program’s provisions;  LINK

https://secure.kentucky.gov/billwatch/BillSummary.aspx?br_rsn=41570&ses_rsn=101

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/18RS/SB118/bill.pdf

(LOUISVILLE, KY) Attorney General Sessions Delivers Remarks on Efforts to Reduce Violent Crime and Fight the Opioid Crisis

Attorney General Sessions Delivers Remarks on Efforts to Reduce Violent Crime and Fight the Opioid Crisis

Louisville, KY – Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Thank you, Russel for that introduction, for your leadership in this office, and for your service as an FBI Special Agent.  As a former senator, I am certain that your experience as a hostage negotiator must have been useful for Senator McConnell.  But seriously, you’ve made big sacrifices for this country and I want you to know that we are grateful.  And I am confident that the people of Western Kentucky are in good hands.
Before I say anything else I want to offer my condolences to the people of Kentucky, who are still in mourning over the senseless shooting that took place in Marshall County last week.  This morning Amy Hess, the FBI Special Agent in Charge for Louisville, briefed me on the shooting, and I want you to know that this Department will do whatever we can to be of assistance. Our FBI experts are some of the best but there are no easy answers.
I want to thank you for your hospitality.  This is my 34th visit to a U.S. Attorney’s Office.  I’m always inspired to meet the attorneys, investigators, and officers who are in the trenches every day making us safer.
On behalf of President Trump, I want to thank all of the law enforcement officers who are here with us today.  He strongly supports you and honors what you do.
In particular I want to recognize Commissioner Rick Sanders of the Kentucky State Police.  Rick has taken the lead on the response to last week’s shooting.  I’m honored that you’re here and I want to thank you for your 24 years in the DEA and 40 years of service in law enforcement.  You have made a real difference in this community.
It was largely because of officers like all of you that crime declined in America for 20 years.
From 2014 to 2016, however, the trends reversed.  The violent crime rate went up by nearly seven percent.  Robberies went up.  Assaults went up nearly 10 percent.  Rape went up by nearly 11 percent.  Murder shot up by more than 20 percent.
Meanwhile, our country has suffered the deadliest drug crisis in our history.  More Americans are dying because of drugs than ever before. In 2016, an estimated 64,000 Americans died of drug overdose—one every nine minutes.  That’s roughly the population of Bowling Green dead in one year.  And in 2017 it appears that the death toll was even higher.
For Americans under the age of 50, drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death.  And millions of Americans are living with the daily struggle of an addiction.
Sadly, Louisville knows this all too well.

The murder rate doubled in Louisville in just two years.  And in December, the Major City Police Chiefs Association of America ranked Louisville as the 11th most dangerous city in the United States.
Meanwhile more people are dying from drug overdoses than ever before.  More than 1,400 Kentuckians died of overdoses in 2016.  Nearly half of these deaths were the result of fentanyl, and a third involved heroin. 
But as we all know, these are not numbers—these are moms, dads, daughters, spouses, friends, and neighbors.
But let me tell you this: we will not stand back and let crime and addiction rise.  Plain and simple, we will not allow the progress made by our women and men in blue over the past two decades to slip through our fingers.  We will not cede one block or one street corner to violent thugs or poison peddlers.
President Trump knows how to give clear orders.  The day I was sworn in as Attorney General, he sent me a simple, straightforward executive order: reduce crime in America.
At the Department of Justice, we embrace that goal.  And you and I know from experience that it can be done.  Crime rates aren’t like the tides—we can take action to help bring them down.
And over the past year, we have taken action.  In 2017, the Department of Justice brought cases against the greatest number of violent criminals in a quarter of a century.  We charged the most federal firearm prosecutions in a decade.  We also arrested and charged hundreds of people suspected of contributing to the ongoing opioid crisis. 
We secured the convictions of nearly 500 human traffickers and 1,200 gang members, and worked with our international allies to arrest or charge more than 4,000 MS-13 members.
MS-13 didn’t like that, by the way.  I saw a news report last week from Voice of America that the MS-13 gang leaders back in El Salvador have taken notice of these efforts.  They know that hundreds of their members are now behind bars.  So now they’re trying to send younger and more violent gang members to the United States to replenish their depleted ranks.
Nationally we are beginning to see positive signs.  In the first six months of last year, the increase in the murder rate slowed significantly and violent crime actually went down.  Publicly available data for the rest of the year suggest further progress.
These are major accomplishments that benefit the American people. And these are your accomplishments.
At the Department of Justice, we are well aware that 85 percent of law enforcement is state, local, and tribal.  These are the authorities that have the critical street level intelligence regarding the criminal element.
We are most effective when these experienced state and local investigators are paired with the resources and expertise of the 15 percent that are our federal law enforcement.
That is the idea behind our crime reduction strategy: Project Safe Neighborhoods, or PSN. PSN encourages U.S. Attorneys’ offices to work with the communities they serve to customize their crime reduction strategies.
And this is a proven model.  One study showed that, in its first seven years, PSN reduced violent crime overall by 4.1 percent, with case studies showing reductions in certain areas of up to 42 percent.  There are Americans who are alive and well today because this program made a difference.
We understand that every district and even every city is different.  I have directed Russell and our other U.S. Attorneys to target the most violent criminals in the most violent areas and to work with local police chiefs, mayors, community groups and victims’ advocates to develop a custom crime reduction plan.  Listening to the people you serve was a winning strategy for me when I was a U.S. Attorney, and I know it will be a winning strategy for you.
In fact, it already is.  Russell and the men and women in this office have done an exemplary job of using this PSN model.  I’m particularly impressed with the Louisville Metro Intelligence—or LMINTEL—which is an intelligence-gathering collaboration between Chris Evans of the DEA, Amy Hess of the FBI, Stuart Lowrey of ATF, the Marshals Service, Commonwealth Attorney Tom Wine, and Chief Conrad of Louisville police.
In the past year, LMINTEL has led to 140 arrests.  Just last week, thanks in part to LMINTEL, a felon who threatened to kill a Louisville Police Officer got a substantial sentence in federal court.
Our goal is not to fill up the prisons.  Our goal is to reduce crime, just as President Trump directed us to do.
I’m also impressed with Project Recoil, which is a PSN partnership between ATF, this office, and state, county, and local law enforcement.  The goal is to charge violent offenders with the most serious provable offense—and maximize their sentence.  I’ve seen how you’ve put away felons possessing firearms for 10 and even 15 years.  These successes prevent violence and make would-be criminals think twice.
You’re doing great work for the people of Western Kentu
cky.
We are right to celebrate these victories.  But we still have a lot more work to do reduce violent crime and turn the tide of the opioid epidemic.
That’s why we are also taking steps to decrease the number of overdose deaths.
For example, in August I announced a new data analytics program – the Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit
. I created this unit to focus specifically on opioid-related health care fraud.  It uses data to identify and prosecute individuals that are contributing to this opioid epidemic.  It can tell us important information about prescription opioids—like who is prescribing the most drugs, who is dispensing the most drugs, and whose patients are dying of overdoses.
The numbers don’t lie—even if the fraudsters do.  And now the fraudsters can’t hide.
I have also assigned experienced prosecutors in opioid hot spot districts to focus solely on investigating and prosecuting opioid-related health care fraud. I have sent these prosecutors to where they are especially needed—including Kentucky.
And in November the DEA reorganized its field divisions for the first time in nearly 20 years. 

The Louisville field office is now upgraded to become the Louisville Field Division, with jurisdiction over Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia.


Now I am announcing today that, over the next 45 days, DEA will surge Special Agents, Diversion Investigators, and Intelligence Research Specialists to focus on pharmacies and prescribers who are dispensing unusual or disproportionate amounts of drugs.
DEA collects some 80 million transaction reports every year from manufacturers and distributors of prescription drugs.  These reports contain information like distribution figures and inventory.  DEA will aggregate these numbers to find patterns, trends, statistical outliers—and put them into targeting packages.
That will help us make more arrests, secure more convictions—and ultimately help us reduce the number of prescription drugs available for Americans to get addicted to or overdose from these dangerous drugs.
I want to personally express my deep appreciation and profound thanks to all the women and men of law enforcement and their families, for sacrificing so much and putting your lives on the line every day so that the rest of us may enjoy the safety and security you provide.  We love you and honor your work.
You can be certain about this: we have your back and you have our thanks.

Speaker:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions

Topic(s):

Drug Trafficking

Violent Crime

Component(s):

Office of the Attorney General

SOURCE LINK

Indiana House votes to allow Hoosier farmers to grow cannabis plants with low THC

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The Indiana House voted unanimously Wednesday for a bill that would allow Hoosier farmers to grow industrial hemp — marijuana’s low-THC cousin.

Under Rep. Jim Lucas’ House Bill 1137, acres of the green leafy plants could be intermingled with rows of corn across family farms in Indiana. Currently only researchers at institutions are allowed to grow the plant, and are unable to do so for commercial purposes. Only Purdue University researchers are growing the product in the state.

The provision could see some push back in the Senate, or from individuals like Attorney General Curtis Hill, who has been outspoken against marijuana legalization.

The Indiana House and Senate appear to be on the same page when it comes to legalizing cannabidiol, a product derived from hemp. However, permitting the growth and manufacturing of hemp would take its legalization a step further.

Many senators were already reluctant to vote for a bill last year that legalized CBD oil for epileptic patients. That measure passed by a 36-13, compared to the unanimous vote in the House.

► More: Holcomb: Indiana stores can continue to sell CBD oil while lawmakers work on fix to law

► More: Indiana takes small step toward legalizing medical marijuana as House votes to study issue

Proponents say House BIll 1137 is a “jobs bill” and could lead to economic growth, while opponents worry about the legality of growing a plant with some similar properties to marijuana.

“Everything I’ve seen says industrial hemp is probably a harmless crop,” Senate leader David Long said. “I have no problem with that, I’m just not sure the federal government issue isn’t still holding us back.”

The federal 2014 farm bill allows states to permit the growth of industrial hemp for research purposes. Kentucky already has a broad industrial hemp pilot program, similar to the pilot program Indiana would begin with this piece of legislation.

Under Kentucky law, farmers can apply for a permit to grow and manufacturer industrial hemp and sell it for various products, such as CBD oil, hemp seed oil and fiber for car manufacturing.

The farm bill permits “marketing research” but also says hemp shouldn’t be grown “for the purpose of general commercial activity.”

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture says its program follows federal law, but others in the industry aren’t so sure.

“There’s been no research that I’ve seen directly,” said Janna Beckerman, a Purdue professor who studies hemp. “It’s sort of a big wink: ‘Oh yea we’re doing research.'”

Indiana would face the same legal question if this bill passes the Senate and is signed into law.

The passage of the law could also be another step towards marijuana legalization, in the eyes of some social conservatives. Already the Indiana House unanimously passed a resolution to study medical marijuana, a unprecedented move for the GOP-led chamber.

The average Hoosier would be unable to differentiate between industrial hemp or marijuana, Beckerman said. Both are leafy and green and both can have a potent smell.

Industrial hemp, however, can’t get users high.

She also said someone could easily hide a marijuana plant in a field of hemp.

Despite legal concerns, Kentucky’s Department of Agriculture has pegged its program as a success. In 2017, Kentucky handlers grew 3,200 acres of hemp in 74 counties. 

“Because of the research conducted by our growers, processors, and universities, I am more optimistic than ever that we can put industrial hemp on a path to widespread commercialization once Congress removes it from the federal list of controlled substances,” Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said in a press release.

Hemp experts say the product could have the same potential in Indiana, once farmers figure out how to properly grow the product.

Indiana is already seen as an agriculture leader and is one of the top 10 agriculture producing states.

“In the long term I think it’s something that will allow our agriculture base to diversify and that’s always a good thing,” Beckerman said. “I think there’s a possibility of different industries developing from this.”

For example FlexForm Technologies, an Elkhart company, manufacturers mats and panel products. Currently the company has to import hemp. That could change if Indiana farmers start growing the product.

Another company, Healthy Hoosier Oil, could use the cold press seed processing they already use to make sunflower seed oil, on hemp seeds to create a food-grade oil.

CBD oil manufacturers could also start using in-state hemp to make their products.

Another issue lawmakers and lobbyist acknowledge they’ll have to solve is educating the public enough to understand the difference between the two plants.

“Industrial hemp has been misaligned with marijuana for the past 70 years or so,” said Justin Swanson, representing Indiana Hemp Industries Association. “It’s time for Indiana’s actions and policies to reflect the fact that industrial hemp is not marijuana and allow the reemerging market to thrive in Indiana once again.”  CONTINUE READING…

Call IndyStar reporter Kaitlin Lange at (317) 432-9270. Follow her on Twitter: @kaitlin_lange.

AgTech’s Diversified, Farmers-First Industrial Hemp Operation to Create 271 Jobs in Bourbon County

Company will work with farmers and UK, make $5M-plus initial investment in Paris facility for developing hemp-based products

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 26, 2018) – AgTech Scientific plans to create 271 jobs at a new hemp-products development and manufacturing center in Paris as it forges relationships with Kentucky farmers and partners on research projects with the state’s flagship university, Gov. Matt Bevin announced today.

“AgTech’s plans for Bourbon County put the company at the forefront of realizing Kentucky’s potential as an international leader in hemp production,” said Gov. Bevin. “The fact that their business plan includes groundbreaking research being performed at the University of Kentucky and mutually beneficial partnerships with our state’s farmers holds exciting possibilities for both industrial and agricultural hemp. This would not have been possible without last year’s efforts to better align state law with federal guidelines, which ensure hemp is grown and processed with the utmost transparency and under strict law enforcement supervision.”

AgTech leaders plan to buy 10 acres and a 10-acre option in the Bourbon County Business Park to build a state-of-the-art, 50,000-square-foot facility, expected to open in 2018. The company’s $5 million-plus investment could grow in the future.

AgTech holds a conditionally approved 2018 grower license from the Kentucky Department of Agriculture Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program and intends to partner with Kentucky farmers for largescale hemp production. The company would then extract cannabidiol (CBD) from the locally grown hemp. CBD differs from THC, the intoxicant in marijuana. Initially, the facility would produce an energy drink incorporating a hemp additive and would later expand its product lineup.

In partnership with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, AgTech is researching potential health benefits of hemp-based additives for animal food. AgTech plans to eventually begin manufacturing pet and equine foods, among other products, contingent on changes to regulations.

Mike French, founder and president of AgTech, said the company chose Kentucky based on agricultural and manufacturing advantages. Increasing hemp yield while reducing risk will be key to building trust in the agricultural community and eventually with consumers, he said.

“Kentucky at one point many years ago was responsible for the vast majority of industrial hemp production,” French said. “The growing conditions are excellent and it’s ideally located geographically and near largescale ‘pick-and-pack’ facilities like Amazon.

“We thought it best to cover the full spectrum, from seed to sale. The best way to do that is to work with the farmer. The state needs to replace tobacco as a cash crop, but growers are used to getting a price before they plant. The problem with industrial hemp has been there is not a known commodity price, or price for quality. We are going to work with Kentucky farmers and guarantee a net price per acre through our Kentucky Farmer Value Added Partnership (KFVAP). If farmers are successful, then AgTech will be successful.”

Founded by Canadian entrepreneurs in 2015, AgTech’s leaders spent the last several years planning and seeking the right location for their company. The opportunity to launch AgTech in a state where hemp has such a rich history in tandem with the state’s largest research institution also made Kentucky attractive.

“Our research partnership with the University of Kentucky will be very important,” French said. “We’ve chosen to start with a three-year study, including actual testing, to better understand taste, effectiveness and overall benefits industrial hemp has for the equine industry and pets.”

Kentucky Department of Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said the addition of AgTech could benefit both rural and urban areas of the state.

“The continued growth and expansion of Kentucky’s nationally renowned hemp industry is creating new markets for our farmers and new jobs for rural as well as urban communities,” Commissioner Quarles said. “We want to thank Governor Bevin and our partners at the University of Kentucky for their continued commitment to growing our agricultural economy. We are thrilled to welcome AgTech to Kentucky.”

Sen. Stephen West, of Paris, said AgTech will make Bourbon County the epicenter of a rebirth in the state’s hemp industry.

“I am proud that AgTech will put Bourbon County on the front line in hemp research and development with its new facility,” Sen. West said. “With the county’s centralized location and ideal growing conditions, I look forward to the success of AgTech’s newest operations and the innovative products they will create for a number of industries.”

Rep. Sannie Overly, of Paris, noted the positive impact the project could have on local farmers.

“It means a lot that Bourbon County and our local farmers will have the opportunity to play a front-line role in the ongoing development of industrial hemp as another major agricultural commodity,” said Rep. Overly. “I appreciate AgTech’s decision to invest in our community and look forward to seeing its innovative ideas become a reality.”

Paris mayor Mike Thornton said AgTech’s approach to hemp creates intriguing possibilities for the company and the community.

“We are excited to partner with the state Economic Development Cabinet and Bourbon County Fiscal Court, to welcome AgTech Scientific to Paris and Bourbon County and look forward to helping them grow and build on their previous successes,” Mayor Thornton said. “Their cutting-edge technology not only creates much needed employment opportunities but offers an exciting new process for industrial hemp that will surely be a huge benefit to our local farmers. With the cooperation of the University of Kentucky, I anticipate seeing great things from AgTech Scientific in the future.”

Bourbon County judge-executive Michael R. Williams said county officials were encouraged by the company’s announcement and optimistic about its plans.

“The Bourbon County Fiscal Court is excited to share in the great news announcing that AgTech Scientific has selected Bourbon County to locate its state of the art facility for its industrial hemp operation,” Judge-Executive Williams said. “Their partnership with the Bourbon County Workforce and Bourbon County Farmers to grow their business will have a tremendous impact on the industry in Kentucky and secure a positive presence for their long term future in Bourbon County. We welcome their investment, their innovative ideas and their vision for the future. It’s great to have AgTech Scientific in Bourbon County.”

To encourage the investment and job growth in the community, the Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority (KEDFA) in January preliminarily approved the company for tax incentives up to $2.4 million through the Kentucky Business Investment program. The performance-based incentive allows a company to keep a portion of its investment over the agreement term through corporate income tax credits and wage assessments by meeting job and investment targets.

In addition, AgTech can receive resources from the Kentucky Skills Network. Through the Kentucky Skills Network, companies can receive no-cost recruitment and job placement services, reduced-cost customized training and job training incentives. In fiscal year 2017, the Kentucky Skills Network provided training for more than 120,000 Kentuckians and 5,700 companies from a variety of industry sectors.

For more information on AgTech, visit www.agtechscientific.com.

A detailed community profile for Paris and Bourbon County can be viewed at http://bit.ly/BourbonCo.

Information on Kentucky’s economic development efforts and programs is available at ThinkKentucky.com. Fans of the Cabinet for Economic Development can also join the discussion on Facebook or follow on Twitter. Watch the Cabinet’s “This is My Kentucky” video on YouTube.

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(KY) This Week at the State Capitol

January 26, 2018

This Week at the State Capitol

Proposed constitutional amendment on victims’ rights is first measure approved by General Assembly in 2018

FRANKFORT — The first bill passed by both chambers of the General Assembly this year is a measure that will allow voters to decide on a “bill of rights” for crime victims.

Senate Bill 3, more commonly known as Marsy’s Law, proposes adding a section to the Kentucky Constitution to give crime victims constitutional rights similar to those afforded to the convicted or accused.

The right to notice of proceedings, the right to reasonable protection from the accused, and the right to legal “standing,” which would give victims the constitutional right to assert their rights in court, are some of the rights included in Marsy’s Law.

Kentucky currently has crime victims’ rights listed in statute, but not in the state’s constitution.

Whether Kentucky amends the state constitution to join at least 6 other states that have adopted Marsy’s Law will ultimately be left up to the voters this fall.

Other bills and resolutions that advanced in the General Assembly this week include:

· SB 71 would require the inclusion of abstinence education in any sexual education curriculum offered by schools. The bill would not limit sex education to an abstinence-only curriculum. The measure was approved by the Senate on Jan. 24 by a 32-5 vote and has been sent to the House for further consideration.

· House Concurrent Resolution 34 asks the federal drug control agencies to accelerate research on the “safety and effectiveness” of medical marijuana. HCR 34 passed the House 73-5 on Jan. 24 and now goes to the Senate for consideration. If approved by both chambers, the resolution would be sent to the FDA, National Institute on Drug Abuse and Drug Enforcement Administration.

· SB 37, which was approved by the Senate Transportation Committee on Jan. 24, would allow some federal and state prisoners to get driver’s licenses so they could participate in work programs or re-entry initiatives outside of prison walls. The bill now goes to the Senate floor for further consideration.

· SB 68 was approved to clarify that a victim of domestic violence is not required to pay the legal fees of a spouse in a divorce action when the spouse is incarcerated for crimes against the petitioner. Under current state law, someone seeking a divorce against an incarcerated person can be held responsible for paying the incarcerated person’s court-appointed lawyer, even when the imprisonment is the result of spousal abuse. The bill was approved unanimously by the Senate Judiciary Committee on Jan. 25 and now goes to the full Senate for consideration.

· House Bill 75, which would give local governments more ways to increase revenue, is on its way to the Senate after passing the House by 95-0 vote on Jan. 23. The bill would allow cities and counties to pursue more aggressive investment through mutual, closed-end and exchange-traded funds and high-quality corporate bonds, all within certain limits and under the guidance of a professional investment adviser.

· SB 72 would curtail the time-honored tradition of naming state buildings and roads after living politicians in Kentucky. The legislation would specifically prohibit the naming of any state building, transportation project, program or initiative after a living statewide current or former constitutional officer, state legislator, state judge or state employee. SB 72 was approved by the Senate State and Local Government Committee on Jan. 24 and now goes to the Senate floor for further consideration.

If you’d like to share feedback on issues under consideration with state lawmakers, please call the General Assembly’s toll-free message line at 1-800-372-7181.

–END–

“Our leaders should scrap the policy of prohibition, pull our dignity and values back out of the gutter where we threw them when Prohibition began…”

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The following is from a post made in 2013 but still holds true today!
Thomas Tony Vance

A ruling was made in the case of the Petition to Reschedule Marijuana from Schedule I, dangerous and having no medical value to Schedule II or lower to more properly reflect marijuana’s actual danger and it’s use as medicine. The Drug Enforcement Administration denied the petition, claiming the huge number of studies showing marijuana’s efficacy and safety in medical use did not meet the DEA’s standards for acceptable clinical studies.

The Court did not rule on marijuana’s use as medicine or it’s scheduling. It only ruled on the Drug Enforcement Administration’s authority to decide what studies count and what studies fail to meet DEA standards. In effect the court ruled that the DEA is free to deny the validity of the studies being used to justify the rescheduling petition and thereby deny the petition.

The Marijuana Tax Stamp Act was the interment used to make marijuana illegal in 1937. This law said that to possess marijuana you must first get a special tax stamp. To get the stamp you had to have the marijuana in your possession but, if you possess the marijuana before you get the stamp, you have already broken the law. Besides the government wasn’t printing stamps anyway cause they knew they wouldn’t be needed. This dirty little law was declared unconstitutional in 1969 and was very quickly replaced with the 1970 Controlled Substances Act, as onerous and unconstitutional a law as the 1937 Tax Stamp Act ever was!

In the just ruled on petition case, we see the old Tax Stamp Act. The DEA denied the petition based on the studies being presented not meeting DEA standards. In order for a study or research to be accepted by the DEA the Government must support the research and provide the marijuana for the research. No marijuana, no acceptable study. Perfect!

The scheduling of marijuana can never be questioned or challenged. Sounds familiar doesn’t it? “What? No tax stamp! You’re under arrest! As with the Tax Stamp Act, the Government has never in all the years since 1970, provided the marijuana for any research.

This evil reincarnation of the old Tax Stamp Act actually points out the total injustice which is the basis of our whole policy on drugs and drug abuse. In the name of continuing this policy of total prohibition we have been willing to sacrifice the very values we purportedly claim to be the soul of what is to be an American. Truth, fairness, freedom and doing the right thing no matter what happens have all been sacrificed on the altar of this failed policy.

Prohibition has not been successful during even one year of it’s 99 year existence.

Our leaders should scrap the policy of prohibition, pull our dignity and values back out of the gutter where we threw them when Prohibition began and replace the 1970 Controlled Substances Act with a 21st Century policy based on science, logic, and the fact that as President Nixon’s own Commission On Drug Abuse said long ago and were ignored, drug abuse is a medical problem not a criminal one. Harm reduction works, prohibition does not.

We know what works, what are we waiting for?

SOURCE LINK

New House Bill Could Merge Kentucky Counties

Graphic courtesy Ralph Davis, EKB

LEXINGTON, Ky. (LEX 18) –  House Bill 243,  sponsored by Republican state Rep. Toby Herald, of Beattyville, would change Kentucky’s political landscape in the most literal way.

The bill would consolidate 100 counties into 34. Larger counties, such as Fayette, Jefferson, Warren and Pike, would remain unchanged.

The counties could be renamed and local governments would consolidate.

A similar bill, HB 242 would also reduce the number of Kentucky’s county and independent school districts. Boyd County would retain its own school district despite merging with Martin and Lawrence in HB 243.

CONTINUE READING…

Create noncodified sections to consolidate various counties in the Commonwealth; stipulate how the county is to be divided into districts, select new county names and county seats, form taxing districts, integrate into representative, senatorial, congressional districts, or judicial circuits, require that records are transferred, treat appointed officials on boards, and the transition of the board functions, account for special districts, transfer contracts, bonds, franchises and other legal instruments to new county, transfer employees employed as of December 31, 2022, to new county, maintain local option status until changed by law, require Circuit Court clerks serve remainder of term concurrently and have duties for that period prescribed by Administrative Office of the Courts, and transition county board of election membership to coordinate with the consolidation.  LINK

YGTBFKM

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/18RS/HB243/bill.pdf

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/18RS/HB242/bill.pdf

KY Cannabis Freedom Coalition Requests Your Help!

PLEASE WATCH THE FOLLOWING VIDEO ON FACEBOOK THROUGH THE LINK PROVIDED…

KCFC SB80

Call NOW 1-800-372-7181

SENATE BILL 80 IS AN ADULT RESPONSIBLE USE BILL ENTERED IN KENTUCKY SENATE ON JANUARY 17, 2018 BY REP. DAN SEUM.

AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis.
     Establish and create new sections of KRS Chapter 245 to define terms, allow for possession, growth, use, processing, purchasing, transfer, and consumption of cannabis;  LINK

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/18RS/SB80/bill.pdf

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/record/18RS/SB80.htm

https://www.facebook.com/kcfc2014/videos/2014330162157575/?multi_permalinks=1881992408759546&notif_id=1516464818467206&notif_t=group_activity

Are you a current or former KY Law Enforcement Officer?

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Are you a current or former KY Law Enforcement Officer?
Now is the time to get active. We have a real chance of passing HB166 medical cannabis for KY patients, but KY law enforcement is standing in the way.
The KY Association of Police Chiefs has come out publicly in opposition of HB166. As you can imagine they hold a lot of clout in KY’s law making process.
They’ve come out against medical cannabis not because fear of drug abuse as they state, but fear of funding cuts & job loss. They’d rather continue arresting the sick & dying than think about potentially loosing funding. If they were really wanting to curb drug use law enforcement should take a serious look at cannabis as states allowing its use have seen an 11% reduction in opioid prescriptions, and a near 25% reduction in overdoses. What other program has had results anywhere near that?
Have they no idea that 29 other states have medical cannabis? Do they really think they’ve lost the funding? In all reality no state has lost federal funding to eradicate marijuana after passing laws opposing marijuana prohibition. 

It’s time we stop arresting KY’s most vulnerable patients for consuming or possessing a plant made by the creator.

Are you former or current law enforcement in KY?
(if you know KY law enforcement officers please share with them)
Contact:
Jim Pendergraff
270-871-2040
Executive Director
368 Amon Lisanby Spur Road
Dawson Springs, Ky 42408
[email protected]
http://kypolicechiefs.org/contact-us/

SOURCE LINK

Bipartisan REFER Act Targets Sessions’ War On Cannabis In High Style

Janet Burns ,

In response to ongoing threats to the cannabis industry from the U.S. Department of Justice and Attorney General Jeff Sessions, lawmakers have prepared a bill meant to nip funding for federal interference in the bud.

Last week, Representative Barbara Lee (D-CA) introduced a house resolution aimed “to protect states and individuals in states that have laws which permit the use of cannabis, and for other purposes,” entitled the Restraining Excessive Federal Enforcement and Regulations of Cannabis Act or REFER Act for short.

Cosponsored by Reps. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), Don Young (R-AK), Dina Titus (D-NV) and Jared Polis (D-CO), HR 4779 would create protections for both medical and recreational cannabis by barring federal funding for any efforts by the justice department to interfere in states’ laws when imposing its own.

That includes efforts which seek to “detain, prosecute, sentence or initiate civil proceedings against an individual, business or property that is involved in the cultivation, distribution, possession, dispensation or the use of cannabis in accordance with the law or regulation of the state or unit of local government in which the individual is located,” according to lawmakers.

Congresswoman Lee commented in a statement, “The federal government should respect the will of the voters in states that have voted to decriminalize cannabis. It’s time to stop wasting taxpayer money on the failed War on Drugs.”

Lee continued, “I’m proud to introduce the REFER Act, which would prevent the Attorney General and others in the Trump Administration from stifling the budding cannabis industry. If the federal government chooses to interfere in these state matters, it’s up to Congress to prevent this harmful overreach.”

In a release, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) praised the bill, which it helped Rep. Lee’s team within drafting the language.

NORML noted that the appropriations-targeting bill would also block the federal government from taking punitive action against a financial institution “solely because [it] provides financial services to an entity” that is involved in marijuana-related activities that are sanctioned on the state level.

Dependable financial services have topped the legal cannabis industry’s wish list for years, especially as federal pressure has continued driving many banks and types of investors to keep their distance.

As a result, legal cannabis operations around the country have been forced to get creative with how they manage, protect or just pay taxes on their cash-heavy revenues and products; when police raids, robberies, or even natural calamities happen, the losses that businesses and individuals incur can often be permanent, leaving otherwise growing businesses hi

Justin Strekal, Political Director for NORML, commented by phone that the nonprofit is “incredibly pleased at the leadership that Rep. Lee has shown” in the marijuana space, including through the REFER bill.

“She truly understands that the federal government needs to get out of the way of states that are ending the absurd and racist policy of marijuana prohibition,” Strekal said. “The REFER Act would go a long way to preventing cannabis bigot AG Jeff Sessions from cracking down on the states that have legalized cannabis.”

“It’s a bill with a fun name and a serious purpose,” he added.

In the past year, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle have helped introduce several pieces of new legislation (and some revamped, long-researched favorites) to address the booming fields of cannabis science, industry, and incarceration in a meaningful way.

As in prior years, recent attempts to change federal cannabis laws have explored different legislative routes to getting the DOJ to lay off while states work to figure it all out.

How effective these approaches will be, both in Congress and on the ground, is yet to be seen. In this moment and juncture in the history of U.S. cannabis, however, it’s at least worth noting (as someone who follows the melee) that confident actions and a little humor can go a long way.

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https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/4779/text