Police Profiling that comes close to heart

           In response to Williston Barracks / Negligent Operation 94/55 zone- I89 Safety Corridor by Vermont State Police press release issued by Corporal Andrew Leise. Your press release was rude and uncalled for the way you treated my brother when you stopped him was wrong. He’s never done anything wrong besides speed. He was late to his job from spending the night at a friends house. You profiling him and saying that you did him a favor by not writing him a ticket but instead issuing a press release to the news is unacceptable in my book. You could have very well made him lose his job. My Brother Kaleb is a good kid at heart just trying to make ends meet by working 3 job’s and living with family sleeping underneath his 14 year old sisters bed. Anyone that is friends or family of Kaleb is welcome to come to his court date for his support on Tuesday, August 27th, 2019  at 8:15 AM at the Edward J Costello Courthouse 32 Cherry St in Burlington, VT 05401

Much Love One Love,

Jakob Alexander McElwain

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Kid Rock is getting his own giant middle finger sculpture from Vermont "It’s quite a thrill for me, honestly."

“It’s quite a thrill for me, honestly.”

Ted Pelkey’s middle finger sculpture being installed at his home in Westford, Vermont. –Courtesy of Ted Pelkey

By

Nik DeCosta-Klipa

1:36 PM

Ted Pelkey’s giant middle finger sculpture apparently has fans beyond Vermont’s Route 128.  And the Westford resident’s work of “art” will soon have a twin in Nashville.

Pelkey says he’s driving down to Tennessee with his wife later this month to hand-deliver a second version of his 700-pound wooden sculpture to singer Kid Rock. As WCAX first reported last week, the country music star called the 54-year-old Vermont native in December to express his admiration — and to ask if he could get his own middle finger sculpture.

“It’s quite a thrill for me, honestly,” Pelkey told Boston.com over the phone Wednesday. “He just really wants one.”

Rock, whose real name is Robert James Ritchie, has made the crude gesture something of his personal signature through his personal appearances, song lyrics, merchandise, and album art. Pelkey said he first got a voicemail from Rock around Christmas, in which the 48-year-old singer said he “liked my style.” Despite recent controversies, Pelkey noted that Rock came off as a real “down-to-earth guy” during their phone calls.

“I would do it for him if it wasn’t Kid Rock,” he added.

Pelkey had the original sculpture commissioned in November to protest Westford town officials, who he felt were treating him unfairly in a dispute over his efforts to build a garage on his property. He paid a local artist for the massive middle finger sculpture, which he mounted on a 16-foot platform in his yard and lit with floodlights. Considered a work of “public art” under Vermont law, the giant bird was allowed to stay up, catching the attention of both Route 128 drivers and nationalnews outlets.

“It was critical to me to make sure that my neighbors and the people who live in this town understood that I didn’t put that up there for them,” Pelkey told Boston.com at the time. “It is aimed directly at the people who sit in our town office.”

Rock is paying $4,000 — the same amount that Pelkey paid — for the second sculpture. Pelkey says he recently picked up Rock’s sculpture from the same artist who commissioned the original and is looking forward to hauling it down to the singer’s Nashville home. According to the Tennessean, Rock owns 170 acres of property in the city’s Whites Creek neighborhood.

The second sculpture won’t be the first crass display Rock has put up in Nashville, even if it will be somewhat hidden in the city’s outskirts. Earlier this year, Nashville’s Metro Council reluctantly approved a 20-foot sign outside the rock star’s new Broadway restaurant, Kid Rock’s Big Ass Honky Tonk Rock N’ Roll Steakhouse, that featured a giant guitar that was intentionally made to look like a woman’s butt.

Read More

(VT) Age Limit For Governor Candidates, Please!

Special Legislative Session Part 2? Age Limit For Governor Candidates, Please!

May 26th, 2018 by CrisEricson2016

Special Legislative Session Part Two??? Age limit for governor candidates, please!!!

We need an age limit for governor candidates, in my personal opinion.

I sent State Attorney General TJ Donovan an email about the idea that little boy minor child Ethan Sonneborn, then age 13, apparently now age 14 if the correct birthdate for the child was given on the internet as May 24, 2004, should not be allowed on the ballot because State and Federal Laws prohibit a minor child age 14 and under from working a full time job, and the job of Governor of Vermont is a full time job.

State Attorney General TJ Donovan did not respond to my emails to him.

I also sent emails to Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos, who did respond, apparently though, he seemed to think it is legal for a minor child boy to be on the official primary election ballot as a
Democratic Party candidate for governor of Vermont.

I also sent emails to Ethics Commissioner Brian Leven and he did respond.  He gave me a recitation of his work experience which included being a legislative counsel before becoming the Ethics Commissioner. Hmmm… sounds like the Fox watching the Hen House to me!

I personally called my local state representative Tom Bock, and
he said he’d investigate. He did state that he met the minor
child boy “candidate” Ethan Sonneborn and he said, “he’s cute”.
Sorry, “cute” is not what I want for Governor of Vermont.

State Representative Tom Bock sent back an email indicating that
the Vermont Secretary of State’s office is going to allow the minor
child boy on the official election ballot as a candidate for governor
of Vermont for the Democrats. His last sentence was something like,
“it’s crazy”.

I showed State Representative Tom Bock’s email to a local public
librarian. She seemed to agree that his statement, something to the
effect of “it’s crazy” might indicate that he agreed with me that
there is something wrong with allowing a minor child boy on the
official primary election ballot for governor of Vermont.

Also, in State Representative Tom Bock’s email, he indicated that
the Vermont Secretary of State’s office stated that if elected,
the minor child boy could not actually work as governor.
Hmmm… interesting.

The news about the minor child boy running for governor of Vermont as a Democrat started about August 2017, do a search for “Ethan Sonneborn”.

He is clearly anti-gun, and because he has had so much news media
stories about him, he may have affected current incumbent Governor Phil Scott’s decision to sign into law three new anti-gun rights laws.

By May 10th, about a month after my first email to State Attorney
General TJ Donovan, I had had enough of all of this. I told the
public librarian I am going to send out a letter in the regular mail.
She said, “someone’s got to do it”, or something like that.

She helped me print out 19 pages of emails to Vermont State Attorney General TJ Donovan and emails to and from Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos and Vermont State Representative Tom Bock and Vermont Ethics Commissioner Brian Leven.

I mailed them certified return receipt with a one page hand written
letter to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions. There clearly was
no reason to contact any U.S. Attorney in the State of Vermont because if they were going to do anything about this at all, they had from last August 2017 to do it, and they had done nothing.
It was time to go over their heads.

My hand written one page letter to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions essentially asked three questions:
(1) Isn’t it a violation of federal child labor laws for a minor child age 14 or under to work a full time job as governor of Vermont?
(2) Isn’t it a violation of federal disenfranchisement laws to
conspire to create a voting ballot whereby voters might vote for a
minor child age 14 or under who can not work for the office being
voted for, if in fact the child is elected, so that their vote
doesn’t really count – they are being disenfranchised?

(3) is it a violation of federal labor health & safety code laws
for a minor child age 14 and under to be present in a 90 minute
candidate debate on television with large heavy duty television
lights? (not legal in Hollywood for a child to be under the
television lights for more than a few minutes at a time).

The certified return receipt card came back from the
U.S. Department of Justice on May 18, 2018.

Isn’t it time to call a special session of the Vermont
Legislature to make a new law prohibiting minor children
from running for governor of Vermont?

The last time I looked on the Vermont Secretary of State
website and in the search box put “2018 candidate listing”,
I did not see minor boy child Ethan Sonneborn’s name.
There is still time to keep his name off the ballot
and protect and preserve the running of government
for adults.

Foreign governments which are communist and
totalitarian and dictatorships would applaud
the Vermont Democratic Party for clearly
promoting CHILD LABOR by their endorsement of
minor child boy, Ethan Sonneborn.
Ethan Sonneborn, minor child boy, age 13 or
now 14, is clearly BEING USED to promote
the idea that children of that age should
be working rather than in school.
This supports Walmart and Dollar Stores
buying clothing, and selling it to us,
that was made in factories and sweat shops
where little girls in communist countries
and dictatorship countries work their
fingers to the bone until they are bleeding
sewing clothing so we can buy it cheap.

Little boy minor child, age 13 or 14, Ethan
Sonneborn, is being used as an example
that CHILD LABOR is acceptable in Vermont,
and his candidacy supports dictators and
communist countries world wide who make
little boys go into coal mines and work
with their faces covered with coal dust,
little boys who will die young of black
lung disease.

Ethan Sonneborn, minor boy child, is being
used, and he is helping communist dictators
and facists worldwide by promoting
CHILD LABOR.

Beware of the new leadership of the Vermont Democrat Party;
who are they, and who put them in place?

Cris Ericson
http://indyVT.com
(802)875-4038

Researcher and Activist Bob Melamede Considers Marijuana a Miracle Drug

by Ken Picard

November 08, 2017

Bob Melamede - MATTHEW THORSEN

Bob Melamede was pissed off, which seemed out of character for a laid-back guy who laughs a lot. Plus, he’d begun the day as he always does — by ingesting 80 to 100 milligrams of oil containing tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive compound in cannabis. That’s enough THC to leave most stoners blissed out for hours.

But Melamede saw good reason to be indignant on a late September morning outside Burlington’s Bern Gallery, where the annual Pipe Classic glassblowing competition was in full swing. A retired DNA researcher, microbiology professor and international cannabis activist, Melamede had heard that a Burlington police officer confiscated all the cannabis oil from a medical marijuana patient who’d flown into town for the event.

The patient, Courtney Soper, arrived at the gallery a few minutes later. The 40-year-old mother of three from Long Island, N.Y., confirmed that, after checking into her hotel the previous night, she had driven to an Old North End café to meet some friends who were also attending the glassblowing event. While she was parking her rental car, she said, a cop pulled her over for making an illegal U-turn.

After smelling marijuana on Soper, the cop searched her car and discovered the cannabis oil. Soper handed over her medical marijuana registry cards from New York and California, explaining that she uses the substance to treat several conditions, including chronic pain. The cop didn’t arrest Soper or issue a ticket, but he took her drugs.

“I said, ‘I have a bottle of Adderall in my bag, also prescribed by my doctor. That’s a controlled substance, too,'” Soper told Melamede. “He didn’t say a thing about that.”

“Who’s the government to tell us what kind of medicine we can use?” Melamede barked. “Fuck them!”

He was ready to make that point at the police station, but Soper nixed the idea for fear it could bring unwanted scrutiny to the Bern Gallery event. In a text to Seven Days, Burlington Police Chief Brandon del Pozo explained later that his officer was just following protocol: Vermont doesn’t recognize medical marijuana cards from other states.

Meanwhile, several twenty- and thirty-somethings milling around outside the Bern Gallery recognized Melamede and greeted him with shouts of “Hey, Dr. Bob!”

As it happens, thousands of people know “Dr. Bob,” who’s not a physician but has a doctoral degree in molecular genetics and biochemistry. A former research professor who taught at the University of Vermont, New York Medical College and the University of Colorado, Melamede now appears regularly in the marijuana press and frequently speaks at international cannabis conventions. His presentations, some of which can be found on YouTube, invariably delve into the science of cannabis and its relationship to human health.

PLEASE CONTINUE READING STORY HERE….

Researcher and Activist Bob Melamede Considers Marijuana a Miracle Drug

by Ken Picard

November 08, 2017

Bob Melamede - MATTHEW THORSEN

Bob Melamede was pissed off, which seemed out of character for a laid-back guy who laughs a lot. Plus, he’d begun the day as he always does — by ingesting 80 to 100 milligrams of oil containing tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive compound in cannabis. That’s enough THC to leave most stoners blissed out for hours.

But Melamede saw good reason to be indignant on a late September morning outside Burlington’s Bern Gallery, where the annual Pipe Classic glassblowing competition was in full swing. A retired DNA researcher, microbiology professor and international cannabis activist, Melamede had heard that a Burlington police officer confiscated all the cannabis oil from a medical marijuana patient who’d flown into town for the event.

The patient, Courtney Soper, arrived at the gallery a few minutes later. The 40-year-old mother of three from Long Island, N.Y., confirmed that, after checking into her hotel the previous night, she had driven to an Old North End café to meet some friends who were also attending the glassblowing event. While she was parking her rental car, she said, a cop pulled her over for making an illegal U-turn.

After smelling marijuana on Soper, the cop searched her car and discovered the cannabis oil. Soper handed over her medical marijuana registry cards from New York and California, explaining that she uses the substance to treat several conditions, including chronic pain. The cop didn’t arrest Soper or issue a ticket, but he took her drugs.

“I said, ‘I have a bottle of Adderall in my bag, also prescribed by my doctor. That’s a controlled substance, too,'” Soper told Melamede. “He didn’t say a thing about that.”

“Who’s the government to tell us what kind of medicine we can use?” Melamede barked. “Fuck them!”

He was ready to make that point at the police station, but Soper nixed the idea for fear it could bring unwanted scrutiny to the Bern Gallery event. In a text to Seven Days, Burlington Police Chief Brandon del Pozo explained later that his officer was just following protocol: Vermont doesn’t recognize medical marijuana cards from other states.

Meanwhile, several twenty- and thirty-somethings milling around outside the Bern Gallery recognized Melamede and greeted him with shouts of “Hey, Dr. Bob!”

As it happens, thousands of people know “Dr. Bob,” who’s not a physician but has a doctoral degree in molecular genetics and biochemistry. A former research professor who taught at the University of Vermont, New York Medical College and the University of Colorado, Melamede now appears regularly in the marijuana press and frequently speaks at international cannabis conventions. His presentations, some of which can be found on YouTube, invariably delve into the science of cannabis and its relationship to human health.

PLEASE CONTINUE READING STORY HERE….

Vermont lawmakers become first to approve legal pot

AP MARIJUANA STATES OF PLAY A FILE USA CA

April McCullum, The Burlington (Vt.) Free Press

MONTPELIER, Vt. — Vermont’s Legislature become the first in the nation Wednesday to approve a recreational marijuana legalization bill.

Vermont’s bill, which would legalize small amounts of marijuana possession in 2018 and anticipate the possibility of a taxed and regulated legal marijuana market, was approved in the Vermont House of Representatives on Wednesday afternoon by a vote of 79-66. The state Senate already passed the bill, so it will go directly to GOP Gov. Phil Scott.

Eight states — Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon and Washington — and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana following a voter referendum, but no state yet has legalized marijuana solely through the legislative process, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Legalization advocates said bills were pending in other state legislatures.

“I think it reflects that Vermont elected officials are more in touch with our constituents than a lot of elected officials in other states,” said Vermont Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman, a member of the Vermont Progressive Party who has worked on marijuana issues for the majority of his political career. “I think the public is ahead of us, but elected officials tend to be cautious when it comes to change.”

Wednesday’s vote closed a debate over legalization, particularly in the state House. The divisiveness once prompted Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe, a Democrat from Burlington, Vt., to predict that legalization would take a miracle to pass this year.

Advocates hugged and shared high-fives outside the two chambers after the vote.

“Vermont elected officials are more in touch with our constituents than a lot of elected officials in other states.”

Earlier in the day, the House Judiciary Committee voted 8-3 to support the limited bill, which was pitched as a compromise between the House and Senate approaches on marijuana.

The proposal incorporates H.170, a House-supported bill that would legalize possession of up to one ounce of marijuana, two mature marijuana plants or four immature marijuana plants for adults older than 21. The effective date was pushed to July 1, 2018.

The bill also sets up a nine-member commission to study the best way to regulate marijuana.

“There’s no slam dunk of any kind,” Rep. Barbara Rachelson, a Burlington Democrat, said about the prospect of a legal marijuana market. “It just is doing work that could be used next year or in subsequent years.”

The proposal would continue to prohibit driving under the influence of marijuana and the use of marijuana in public places. Employers, landlords, schools and prisons could continue to restrict marijuana use.

“The data indicates that our youth are using marijuana more infrequently, and I don’t think we should put that in jeopardy,” said GOP Rep. Scott Beck of St. Johnsbury, Vt., who voted against the bill.

Democratic Rep. Susan Buckholz of Hartford, Vt., said declining marijuana use among the state’s high school students, measured at 37% in the latest Vermont Youth Risk Behavior Survey, shows that anti-drug education is working.

“We need to make a move to be treating this as a public health issue for those for whom it is a health issue and letting other people use this substance responsibly,” Buckholz said.

Vermont's House minority leader, GOP Rep. Don Turner

Vermont’s House minority leader, GOP Rep. Don Turner of Milton, speaks May 10, 2017, against a marijuana legalization bill at the Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt. (Photo: Glenn Russell, The Burlington (Vt.) Free Press)

If Scott signs the bill, a new commission would be responsible for drafting a system to tax and regulate marijuana and submitting the plan to the Legislature. The end result would need to be a marijuana regulatory system that  “increases public safety and reduces harm to public health.”

“The administration will be at the table, along with the attorney general and others,” said Democratic Rep. Maxine Grad of Moretown, Vt., chairwoman of the House Judiciary Committee. “With Massachusetts and Maine starting up in 2018, I think we need to continue this conversation.”

Scott repeatedly has expressed concerns about marijuana and highway safety. He has the choice to sign the bill, veto the bill, or allow it to become law without his signature.

The first-term Republican governor declined to say before Wednesday’s House vote whether he would veto the legislation.

“I don’t believe this is a priority for Vermont,” Scott said. “I believe that what we should be doing is trying to find ways to protect those on our highways, deliver a level of impairment that is consistent throughout the Northeast, as well as to address the edibles for our kids before we move forward with legalization. Having said that, I’m going to review the bill as it’s passed.”

Follow April McCullum on Twitter: @April_McCullum

Note: Vermont legislators changed the effective date of the bill below to July 1, 2018.

CONTINUE READING….

PDF OF H 170 AND VIDEO

Vermont lawmakers become first to approve legal pot

AP MARIJUANA STATES OF PLAY A FILE USA CA

April McCullum, The Burlington (Vt.) Free Press

MONTPELIER, Vt. — Vermont’s Legislature become the first in the nation Wednesday to approve a recreational marijuana legalization bill.

Vermont’s bill, which would legalize small amounts of marijuana possession in 2018 and anticipate the possibility of a taxed and regulated legal marijuana market, was approved in the Vermont House of Representatives on Wednesday afternoon by a vote of 79-66. The state Senate already passed the bill, so it will go directly to GOP Gov. Phil Scott.

Eight states — Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon and Washington — and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana following a voter referendum, but no state yet has legalized marijuana solely through the legislative process, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Legalization advocates said bills were pending in other state legislatures.

“I think it reflects that Vermont elected officials are more in touch with our constituents than a lot of elected officials in other states,” said Vermont Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman, a member of the Vermont Progressive Party who has worked on marijuana issues for the majority of his political career. “I think the public is ahead of us, but elected officials tend to be cautious when it comes to change.”

Wednesday’s vote closed a debate over legalization, particularly in the state House. The divisiveness once prompted Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe, a Democrat from Burlington, Vt., to predict that legalization would take a miracle to pass this year.

Advocates hugged and shared high-fives outside the two chambers after the vote.

“Vermont elected officials are more in touch with our constituents than a lot of elected officials in other states.”

Earlier in the day, the House Judiciary Committee voted 8-3 to support the limited bill, which was pitched as a compromise between the House and Senate approaches on marijuana.

The proposal incorporates H.170, a House-supported bill that would legalize possession of up to one ounce of marijuana, two mature marijuana plants or four immature marijuana plants for adults older than 21. The effective date was pushed to July 1, 2018.

The bill also sets up a nine-member commission to study the best way to regulate marijuana.

“There’s no slam dunk of any kind,” Rep. Barbara Rachelson, a Burlington Democrat, said about the prospect of a legal marijuana market. “It just is doing work that could be used next year or in subsequent years.”

The proposal would continue to prohibit driving under the influence of marijuana and the use of marijuana in public places. Employers, landlords, schools and prisons could continue to restrict marijuana use.

“The data indicates that our youth are using marijuana more infrequently, and I don’t think we should put that in jeopardy,” said GOP Rep. Scott Beck of St. Johnsbury, Vt., who voted against the bill.

Democratic Rep. Susan Buckholz of Hartford, Vt., said declining marijuana use among the state’s high school students, measured at 37% in the latest Vermont Youth Risk Behavior Survey, shows that anti-drug education is working.

“We need to make a move to be treating this as a public health issue for those for whom it is a health issue and letting other people use this substance responsibly,” Buckholz said.

Vermont's House minority leader, GOP Rep. Don Turner

Vermont’s House minority leader, GOP Rep. Don Turner of Milton, speaks May 10, 2017, against a marijuana legalization bill at the Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt. (Photo: Glenn Russell, The Burlington (Vt.) Free Press)

If Scott signs the bill, a new commission would be responsible for drafting a system to tax and regulate marijuana and submitting the plan to the Legislature. The end result would need to be a marijuana regulatory system that  “increases public safety and reduces harm to public health.”

“The administration will be at the table, along with the attorney general and others,” said Democratic Rep. Maxine Grad of Moretown, Vt., chairwoman of the House Judiciary Committee. “With Massachusetts and Maine starting up in 2018, I think we need to continue this conversation.”

Scott repeatedly has expressed concerns about marijuana and highway safety. He has the choice to sign the bill, veto the bill, or allow it to become law without his signature.

The first-term Republican governor declined to say before Wednesday’s House vote whether he would veto the legislation.

“I don’t believe this is a priority for Vermont,” Scott said. “I believe that what we should be doing is trying to find ways to protect those on our highways, deliver a level of impairment that is consistent throughout the Northeast, as well as to address the edibles for our kids before we move forward with legalization. Having said that, I’m going to review the bill as it’s passed.”

Follow April McCullum on Twitter: @April_McCullum

Note: Vermont legislators changed the effective date of the bill below to July 1, 2018.

CONTINUE READING….

PDF OF H 170 AND VIDEO

Legendary pot grower Johnny Boone, leader of Kentucky's 'Cornbread Mafia,' back in U.S.

636270046066628711-boone.jpg

John “Johnny” Boone, the leader of Kentucky’s “Cornbread Mafia,” once the nation’s largest domestic marijuana producing organization, is back in the United States after eight years on the lam.

Boone, who was once featured on “America’s Most Wanted,” was apprehended in Canada in December 2016 and was ordered detained Wednesday after appearing in U.S. District Court in Burlington, Vermont, about 90 miles south of Montreal.

He had been extradited to the U.S. and will be transported to Louisville soon, according to Kraig LaPorte, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in Burlington. Wendy McCormick, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s office in Louisville, said it could be a week or two before he is flown to Louisville on a U.S. Marshal Service flight.

Boone, 73, a legendary figure in central Kentucky, faces charges on a 2008 indictment that accused him of growing and distributing marijuana on his farm in Springfield, where more than 2,400 marijuana plants allegedly were found by Kentucky State Police and the Drug Enforcement Administration. The government is also trying to force him to forfeit cash, vehicles, a handgun and an AR-15 rifle.

He fled after a warrant was issued for his arrest, and he faces up to life in prison if convicted.

►EARLIER COVERAGE: ‘Cornbread Mafia’ fugitive in court

Federal prosecutors in Vermont requested his detention, saying he faces a long prison term and at age 73 has a strong incentive to flee. The motion also noted that he’d lived illegally in Canada for eight years, “which alone renders him a flight risk.”

The Cornbread Mafia, a group of mostly Kentuckians, pooled their money, machinery, knowledge and labor to produce $350 million in pot seized in Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska and Wisconsin, prosecutors said in 1989.

The organization operated on isolated farms in nine Midwestern states, some of which were guarded by bears and lions, and by workers described by the government as a “paramilitary force.” Boone’s exploits were the subject of a book, “Cornbread Mafia: A Homegrown Syndicate’s Code Of Silence And The Biggest Marijuana Bust In American History,” by Kentucky freelance writer James Higdon.

U.S. Attorney Joe Whittle said in 1989 that marijuana had been seized at 29 sites, including 25 farms outside Kentucky. Sixty-four Kentucky residents were charged, 49 of whom lived in Marion County.

The detention motion says Boone’s criminal history extends to 1969 and includes a 1985 conviction for marijuana possession with intention to distribute, for which he was sentenced to five years, and another conviction for unlawful manufacture of 1,000 plants or more, for which he was sentenced to 20 years and paroled in 1999.

Reporter Andrew Wolfson can be reached at (502) 582-7189 or [email protected].

CONTINUE READING…