Kentucky Veterans Need Your Help!

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Are you a Veteran living in Kentucky who supports medicinal marijuana?

WE NEED YOUR HELP!!!

We’re asking that you attend the January 16th Veterans Executive Council (JECVO) Meeting. JECVO is an organization that represents 24 different Veterans groups.

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Above:  JECVO PAO Dave Jarrett, State Senator Dan Seum, KDVA Commissioner Benjamin Adams, JECVO Chairman Denzil Lile, and JECVO Vice-Chairman Jack Mattingly.

We will present council members with a resolution in support of cannabis and will ask that they voice support of our

Medical Cannabis Bill.

Veterans Organizations that will be there:

Air Force Association (AFA)

Air Force Sergeants Association (AFSA)

American Legion (AL)

American Veterans (AMVETS)

Armed Forces E-9 Association (AFE9A)

Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association (CVMA)

Disabled American Veterans (DAV)

Fleet Reserve Association (FRA)

Forty & Eight Association (40&8)

KY Veterans Hall of Fame Foundation (KVHOFF)

Korean War Veterans (KWVA)

Ladies Auxiliary Military Order Purple Heart (LAMOPH)

Marine Corps League (MCL)

Military Officers Association of America (MOAA)

Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH)

National Association for Black Veterans (NABVETS)

Navy Leagues of the United States (NLUS)

Non Commissioned Officers Association (NCOA)

Operation Stand Down (OSD)

Owensboro-Daviess County Veterans (OCDV)

Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA)

Pearl Harbor Commemorative Association (PHCA)

Task Force Omega KY (TFO)

United Auto Workers Association (UAW)

Veterans Memorial Park of Kentucky (VMPK)

Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW)

Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA)

More information at this link:
https://veterans.ky.gov/otherprograms/Pages/JECVO.aspx

March 7, 2018 Today In Frankfort; Praying for HB 166 !

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As I sat here patiently waiting for the Kentucky Legislature to take a vote on HB 166, I was thinking of a way to say,

“Thank-You”

to ALL of the people who took a stand this year in Kentucky!

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Jaime Montalvo   Justin Lewandoski   Eric Michelle Crawford   Pat Dunegan   Jennifer Dunegan   Dan Seum   Sally Oh   Dan Malano Seum   Tony Ashley   Elihu Shepherd   Tim Simpson   Henry Fox   Gina Daugherty   Chad Wilson    Thomas Tony Vance    Rebecca Collins   Blackii Effing Whyte 

There are many more which have not been listed here! 

Remembering also those that have in past years took up this fight and were the leaders from the beginning!

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Gatewood Galbraith – Wikipedia   Galbraith supported the legalization of recreational marijuana use, arguing that the framers of the US Constitution “did not say we have a Constitutional right to possess alcohol. They said we have a Constitutional right to privacy in our homes, under which fits the possession of an extremely poisonous alcohol. Now this is the law in Kentucky today. In fact, it is these rulings that keep the Kentucky State Police from kicking down the doors of people possessing alcohol in Kentucky’s 77 ‘dry’ counties right now and hauling their butts off to jail. Now Marijuana is a demonstrably less harmful substance than alcohol and presents far less of threat to public welfare. So it also fits in a person’s right to privacy in their home. It’s beyond the police power of the state as long as I don’t sell it and it’s for my own personal use.”[10]

Craig Lee   Tony Adkins  Ron Moore  David Weigand   Angela Gatewood   Erin Grossman Vu  Robin Rider-Osborne   Paula Willett  Cher Ford-mccullough Brian McCullough  Mary Thomas-Spears  Lynne Wilson  Roland A. Duby   Hugh Yonn  Patrick Moore  

Again, I have missed so many names that should be listed here! 

Many people put their own lives on hold to take on Kentucky’s Cannabis battle, whether it be for medicinal, recreational or even palliative care, they all took a stand…and walked all the way to Frankfort to prove it.    Not literally, of course.  I hope they all had a decent ride to get there but surely there were a few old broken down cars in the parking lot as well.  But by the time they all left there yesterday evening it felt as though they had  literally walked those miles.

All different types of people working toward one cause – to get so
me kind of Cannabis reform into Kentucky!

At the end of the day, the vote for HB 166 was passed over!  A very disappointing outcome for many thousands of Kentuckians who very much needed that Bill to pass! 

How is it possible that legislation so favored by the citizens has not already become law? What is it about this legislation that has Kentucky’s legislators so scared that they are willing to buck the will of the majority of the citizens?
I am of course talking about the legalization of cannabis for medical uses. With 80% favorability and a multitude of benefits arising from the use of cannabis it is confounding to see the Assembly leadership refuse the will of the people and bury all cannabis bills in committee. For what purpose are they doing this?  LINK

When I first started posting to blogs about medical cannabis or “repeal prohibition” it was 2003.  That was 15 years ago.  By the time I became affiliated with the USMjParty it was 2005 and 2010 before I really became involved in any administration of the group.  I always fought for the repeal of prohibition as a whole, but most importantly for Cannabis because yes, I believe Cannabis is a medicine, but first it has to be recognized as a food or ‘herb’ that cannot be controlled by the U.N. or any Government entity!  It is our unalienable right to grow and use the plants that our “Creator” put here on this planet for us! Only commerce can be controlled by our Government, according to the Constitution.  Therefore what we grow on our property or consume in our homes is actually none of the Government’s business!  But they MADE it their business – a long time ago. 

To understand how they accomplished this takeover, you can read the “Elkhorn Manifesto” through this link.  That was the beginning of the downfall of the United States as we see it today.  The U.N. which was formed in 1945 with five founding members including the United States was the beginning of the NWO as we know it today.  The ONDCP and the 1961 Narcotic Convention as well as the 1970 Controlled Substance Act and the DEA instituted by Nixon, as a requirement of the 1970 CSA, as per the U.N., conveniently wrapped up our lives under the control of the NWO.  I wrote about this a couple of years ago and it has a lot of interesting links of information it that article.

The U.N. just issued a statement reminding all signatory Countries to be mindful of their “Treaties” regarding Marijuana.

Be mindful of the fact that it is not just Marijuana that they seek to control.  Control the food and medicine and you will control the people.

We are just now seeing how one world Government will work.  It is reaching into all facets of our lives, some not noticeable yet to the average person, not just whether or not Marijuana is “legal”. 

All of these things together, coupled with the fact that our Legislature has their own agenda for Kentucky influences the outcome of any Cannabis legislation being passed here. 

We still have a couple weeks to see what the outcome will be for the Citizens of Kentucky.  Will the hard work by our dedicated Activists pay off for the Patients who are in such need in our State?  We can only continue to pray and also continue calling

1-800-372-7181

and make sure your voice is heard!

As well, K.C.F.C. and others are gathering in Frankfort to show support.  You can follow them at this LINK.

There is a VERY good article documenting all of the Cannabis Bills in Kentucky this year at Kentucky Free Press.  If you haven’t already done so I encourage you to look at it.

Sally Oh,  who writes for Kentucky Free Press, was LIVE on Facebook on February 25th, explaining Medical Cannabis, States’ Rights & the Civil War  and I encourage you to view that video as well.

Sally Oh KY Free Press

Again, I want to thank everyone that has made an effort of any kind in Kentucky toward the repeal of Cannabis prohibition!  We all basically want the same thing – our patients to be taken care of and the freedom to possess, grow and consume a plant that our Creator blessed us with!

God Bless!

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VA says it won’t study medical marijuana’s effect on veterans

The Department of Veterans Affairs says it will not conduct research into whether medical marijuana could help veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain, as veterans groups are pushing for the use of the drug as an alternative to opioids and anti-depressants.

In a letter to U.S. Rep. Tim Walz (D-Minn.), Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin said VA’s ability to research medical marijuana is hampered by the fact that the drug is illegal federally. Shulkin’s letter came in response to an inquiry by 10 Democrats on the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee. The letter asks Shulkin to commit the VA to investigating whether medical marijuana can help veterans suffering from PTSD and chronic pain and identify barriers to doing so.

“VA is committed to researching and developing effective ways to help Veterans cope with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain conditions,” Shulkin wrote in a response to the members of Congress. “However, federal law restricts VA’s ability to conduct research involving medical marijuana, or to refer veterans to such projects.”

The response comes as at least 29 states, plus the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico, have legalized the use of medical marijuana in some form. Veterans groups, including the American Legion, have been pushing for the drug to be studied and used to help ease the effects of PTSD, chronic pain and other disorders.

“What America’s veterans need prioritized right now is for cannabis to be treated as a health policy issue,” said Nick Etten, founder and executive director of the Veterans Cannabis Project. “We’re desperate for solutions for the conditions we’re dealing with.”

According to a 2017 VA review, about 15 percent of veterans treated at outpatient PTSD clinics reported using marijuana in the previous six months. According to an American Legion phone survey released in November, 22 percent of veteran household respondents said they used cannabis to treat a medical condition. Ninety-two percent of veteran households surveyed for the Legion said they support researching whether marijuana can effectively treat mental and physical conditions and 82 percent said they want to have medical cannabis as a legal treatment option.

Last month the Veterans Health Administration urged patients to discuss medical marijuana use with their doctors. The shift will allow doctors and patients to determine what, if any, effect marijuana use might have on treatment plans. Veterans were earlier concerned that admitting to marijuana use could jeopardize their benefits. But VA physicians still cannot refer patients to state medical marijuana programs because of the federal prohibition.

[ VA Clears The Air On Talking To Patients About Marijuana Use ]

John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management at the Brookings Institution, said even though marijuana is illegal federally, research on the drug is not prohibited.

“Obviously it is federally illegal, but there are no restrictions on doing scientific research on it. Universities do this all the time and there’s a process to go through,” he said, noting that the National Institute on Drug Abuse funds cannabis research. “It’s really a cop out for the VA to say, ‘oh, we’re not doing work on this because of federal law’ when actually federal law allows them to do that.”

Shulkin’s response was “disappointing and unacceptable,” Walz, the House committee’s ranking member, said in a statement.

“VA’s response not only failed to answer our simple question, but they made a disheartening attempt to mislead me, my colleagues and the veteran community in the process” by stating that the VA is restricted from conducting marijuana research. Walz, a veteran, said he plans to send another letter to Shulkin asking for further clarification.

A spokesman for Shulkin pointed to the secretary’s past comments on medical marijuana. Shulkin said in May, “My opinion is, is that some of the states that have put in appropriate controls, there may be some evidence that this is beginning to be helpful. And we’re interested in looking at that and learning from that. But until the time that federal law changes, we are not able … to prescribe medical marijuana for conditions that may be helpful.”

Shulkin said VA is offering a suite of alternative treatments for patients with PTSD, including yoga, meditation, acupuncture and hypnosis. The letter also said VA has a program to reduce the amount of opioids prescribed to patients with chronic pain; since 2013, Shulkin wrote, 33 percent fewer patients were receiving opioids.

There has not been much research into marijuana for medical purposes, in large part because of regulatory hurdles and the fact that marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 drug along with substances including heroin. Until 2016, only researchers at the University of Mississippi were allowed to grow marijuana for scientific use; the DEA relaxed the rules and let other institutions apply to do so, though none have yet been approved.

President Trump said during the campaign that he supports making medical marijuana available to the very sick. His attorney general, Jeff Sessions, is a staunch opponent of marijuana. Sessions this month made it easier for prosecutors to enforce federal law in states that legalized marijuana. Eight states and the District allow the recreational use of marijuana.

Shulkin cited a VA analysis of existing research, which found “insufficient evidence” that medical marijuana helps patients with chronic pain or PTSD and could increase harm in some areas, including car crashes. A study by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine that reviewed studies on the health effects of marijuana and associated products found they can provide a “significant reduction in pain symptoms” for chronic-pain patients. But many say there has been a paucity of research.

“There has been no meaningful clinical research conducted on PTSD and brain injuries,” Etten said.

CONTINUE READING…

VA says it won't study medical marijuana's effect on veterans

The Department of Veterans Affairs says it will not conduct research into whether medical marijuana could help veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain, as veterans groups are pushing for the use of the drug as an alternative to opioids and anti-depressants.

In a letter to U.S. Rep. Tim Walz (D-Minn.), Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin said VA’s ability to research medical marijuana is hampered by the fact that the drug is illegal federally. Shulkin’s letter came in response to an inquiry by 10 Democrats on the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee. The letter asks Shulkin to commit the VA to investigating whether medical marijuana can help veterans suffering from PTSD and chronic pain and identify barriers to doing so.

“VA is committed to researching and developing effective ways to help Veterans cope with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain conditions,” Shulkin wrote in a response to the members of Congress. “However, federal law restricts VA’s ability to conduct research involving medical marijuana, or to refer veterans to such projects.”

The response comes as at least 29 states, plus the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico, have legalized the use of medical marijuana in some form. Veterans groups, including the American Legion, have been pushing for the drug to be studied and used to help ease the effects of PTSD, chronic pain and other disorders.

“What America’s veterans need prioritized right now is for cannabis to be treated as a health policy issue,” said Nick Etten, founder and executive director of the Veterans Cannabis Project. “We’re desperate for solutions for the conditions we’re dealing with.”

According to a 2017 VA review, about 15 percent of veterans treated at outpatient PTSD clinics reported using marijuana in the previous six months. According to an American Legion phone survey released in November, 22 percent of veteran household respondents said they used cannabis to treat a medical condition. Ninety-two percent of veteran households surveyed for the Legion said they support researching whether marijuana can effectively treat mental and physical conditions and 82 percent said they want to have medical cannabis as a legal treatment option.

Last month the Veterans Health Administration urged patients to discuss medical marijuana use with their doctors. The shift will allow doctors and patients to determine what, if any, effect marijuana use might have on treatment plans. Veterans were earlier concerned that admitting to marijuana use could jeopardize their benefits. But VA physicians still cannot refer patients to state medical marijuana programs because of the federal prohibition.

[ VA Clears The Air On Talking To Patients About Marijuana Use ]

John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management at the Brookings Institution, said even though marijuana is illegal federally, research on the drug is not prohibited.

“Obviously it is federally illegal, but there are no restrictions on doing scientific research on it. Universities do this all the time and there’s a process to go through,” he said, noting that the National Institute on Drug Abuse funds cannabis research. “It’s really a cop out for the VA to say, ‘oh, we’re not doing work on this because of federal law’ when actually federal law allows them to do that.”

Shulkin’s response was “disappointing and unacceptable,” Walz, the House committee’s ranking member, said in a statement.

“VA’s response not only failed to answer our simple question, but they made a disheartening attempt to mislead me, my colleagues and the veteran community in the process” by stating that the VA is restricted from conducting marijuana research. Walz, a veteran, said he plans to send another letter to Shulkin asking for further clarification.

A spokesman for Shulkin pointed to the secretary’s past comments on medical marijuana. Shulkin said in May, “My opinion is, is that some of the states that have put in appropriate controls, there may be some evidence that this is beginning to be helpful. And we’re interested in looking at that and learning from that. But until the time that federal law changes, we are not able … to prescribe medical marijuana for conditions that may be helpful.”

Shulkin said VA is offering a suite of alternative treatments for patients with PTSD, including yoga, meditation, acupuncture and hypnosis. The letter also said VA has a program to reduce the amount of opioids prescribed to patients with chronic pain; since 2013, Shulkin wrote, 33 percent fewer patients were receiving opioids.

There has not been much research into marijuana for medical purposes, in large part because of regulatory hurdles and the fact that marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 drug along with substances including heroin. Until 2016, only researchers at the University of Mississippi were allowed to grow marijuana for scientific use; the DEA relaxed the rules and let other institutions apply to do so, though none have yet been approved.

President Trump said during the campaign that he supports making medical marijuana available to the very sick. His attorney general, Jeff Sessions, is a staunch opponent of marijuana. Sessions this month made it easier for prosecutors to enforce federal law in states that legalized marijuana. Eight states and the District allow the recreational use of marijuana.

Shulkin cited a VA analysis of existing research, which found “insufficient evidence” that medical marijuana helps patients with chronic pain or PTSD and could increase harm in some areas, including car crashes. A study by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine that reviewed studies on the health effects of marijuana and associated products found they can provide a “significant reduction in pain symptoms” for chronic-pain patients. But many say there has been a paucity of research.

“There has been no meaningful clinical research conducted on PTSD and brain injuries,” Etten said.

CONTINUE READING…

Department of Defense Sidestepping FDA on MMJ for Soldiers on the Ground

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Congress has presented President Donald Trump with a bill that could provide an avenue for DoD to give active service members access to medical cannabis

A new defense bill could open the door for active duty soldiers to use marijuana for medicinal purposes. The National Defense Authorization Act (HR-2810) gives the Department of Defense, rather than the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the authority to approve drugs and medical devices.

The bill is designed “to reduce the number of deaths or the severity of harm to members of the armed forces… caused by a risk or agent of war.” It doesn’t specifically list medical marijuana, yet it could be used to allow military members serving outside the United States the freedom to use non-FDA-approved substances including cannabis. In other words, it would give the Pentagon the authority to distribute medical marijuana.

After being approved the U.S. House of Representatives on November 14, and then agreed to by the Senate on November 16, the measure was sent to President Donald Trump, who hasn’t given any indication as to whether he plans to sign the bill.

As of now, the FDA has the sole power to authorize medical drugs and devices. Federally, marijuana is classified as a Schedule I substance and therefore illegal, prohibiting Veterans Affairs (VA) from discussing and recommending medical cannabis.

Section 732 of HR-2810 would allow the Department of Defense to sidestep the FDA and marijuana’s Schedule I status to sign off on cannabis as a medical treatment to those serving the country overseas.

Lawmakers supporting the bill, including House armed Services Chairman Mac Thornberry (R-Texas), said the bill is long overdue and necessary, claiming the FDA isn’t acting swiftly enough to provide troops with the medical support they need.

“The chairman has perfect moral clarity on this provision, and there is no doubt in his mind that it is the right thing to do for the troops,” said House Armed Services spokesman Claude Chafin.

“This bill is the result of a lengthy, bipartisan process to ensure that United States military’s needs are properly met,” said Rep. Bill Shuster (R-PA), a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee.

PLEASE CONTINUE READING!

Department of Defense Sidestepping FDA on MMJ for Soldiers on the Ground

Feature Image


Congress has presented President Donald Trump with a bill that could provide an avenue for DoD to give active service members access to medical cannabis

A new defense bill could open the door for active duty soldiers to use marijuana for medicinal purposes. The National Defense Authorization Act (HR-2810) gives the Department of Defense, rather than the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the authority to approve drugs and medical devices.

The bill is designed “to reduce the number of deaths or the severity of harm to members of the armed forces… caused by a risk or agent of war.” It doesn’t specifically list medical marijuana, yet it could be used to allow military members serving outside the United States the freedom to use non-FDA-approved substances including cannabis. In other words, it would give the Pentagon the authority to distribute medical marijuana.

After being approved the U.S. House of Representatives on November 14, and then agreed to by the Senate on November 16, the measure was sent to President Donald Trump, who hasn’t given any indication as to whether he plans to sign the bill.

As of now, the FDA has the sole power to authorize medical drugs and devices. Federally, marijuana is classified as a Schedule I substance and therefore illegal, prohibiting Veterans Affairs (VA) from discussing and recommending medical cannabis.

Section 732 of HR-2810 would allow the Department of Defense to sidestep the FDA and marijuana’s Schedule I status to sign off on cannabis as a medical treatment to those serving the country overseas.

Lawmakers supporting the bill, including House armed Services Chairman Mac Thornberry (R-Texas), said the bill is long overdue and necessary, claiming the FDA isn’t acting swiftly enough to provide troops with the medical support they need.

“The chairman has perfect moral clarity on this provision, and there is no doubt in his mind that it is the right thing to do for the troops,” said House Armed Services spokesman Claude Chafin.

“This bill is the result of a lengthy, bipartisan process to ensure that United States military’s needs are properly met,” said Rep. Bill Shuster (R-PA), a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee.

PLEASE CONTINUE READING!

Grimes Encourages Kentucky Cities, Counties To Endorse Medical Marijuana

Posted: Nov 29, 2017 2:59 PM CST Updated: Nov 29, 2017 2:59 PM CST

FRANKFORT, Ky. (LEX 18) – Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes is encouraging Kentucky cities and counties to endorse medical marijuana legislation which can help their citizens, many who are veterans fighting physical and mental illnesses, get care and relief they need.

“It’s clear momentum is building for medical cannabis in Kentucky. I challenge our local officials in cities and counties across the Commonwealth to join in the effort to bring relief to thousands of Kentuckians who suffer daily – their own citizens,” Grimes said. “This affects people in every county and corner of the state. Local officials should step up for their constituents to support medical cannabis legislation in the General Assembly in 2018. We can’t leave our people who are hurting behind.”

Maysville and Mason County have recently taken official action in support of legalization legislation.

Eric Crawford lives every single day in pain from an automobile accident he suffered as a young man,” said Grimes. “It’s because of Eric that both Maysville and Mason County, where he lives, have endorsed the effort to bring Kentuckians relief with medical cannabis. The people it can help – like Eric – are their friends and neighbors. They go to church with them every Sunday. They see them in the grocery store. This issue has a face and a name for our local officials.”

Maysville adopted a resolution last year that “encourages the Kentucky General Assembly to consider legislation for medical marijuana which provides for the care, comfort and relief” of Crawford and other Kentuckians who can benefit from medical marijuana. Mason County’s fiscal court adopted a similar resolution in 2014.

Crawford, a member of Grimes’ panel advising on medical marijuana legislation, told the group last week that medical marijuana had significantly improved his conditions. He showed the dozens of prescription pain relievers, including narcotics, he had been prescribed and have many adverse side effects. Crawford said he feels the most relief with marijuana, which is illegal in Kentucky.

Medical marijuana is legal in 29 states and the District of Columbia.

The Madisonville Messenger reported Wednesday that members of the Hopkins County Fiscal Court this week voiced support for legalizing medical marijuana in Kentucky.

Grimes’ panel last week also heard from other individuals, including two veterans, who attested to the way medical marijuana had greatly benefited them in dealing with physical and mental illnesses. The veterans said severe post-traumatic stress stemming from their service in Iraq had impacted their work and relationships.

Significant evidence exists showing marijuana counters side effects of a large number of illnesses and diseases, including cancer, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Crohn’s disease, hepatitis C, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

CONTINUE READING…

“It’s the height of hypocrisy,”…

FDA Is Open To Medical Marijuana For Vets, But Other Agencies Stand In The Way

Mona Zhang , Contributor

Dr. Sue Sisley, a medical marijuana researcher, speaks at the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office Wednesday, April 14, 2010 at the Capitol in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)

When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned cannabidiol producers against making medical claims about cannabis products, it seemed par for the course for any federal agency. Cannabis is simply not considered medicine in the eyes of the government.

But the FDA actually appears pretty open to considering the potential of marijuana as medicine. “We’ve had good experiences working with the FDA,” said Brad Burge, communications director at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS). The non-profit is currently conducting the first FDA- and DEA-approved clinical trial on whole-plant marijuana and enrolled its 30th participant on October 26.

“We have a long relationship with the FDA — a lot through our MDMA research. They’ve been open to approving research protocols into Schedule I drugs,” said Burge. “It’s other regulatory agencies that have been standing in the way.”

It’s certainly unhelpful that the National Institutes of Drug Abuse have a monopoly on growing research cannabis. The Drug Enforcement Administration and the Justice Department aren’t helpful on this front either. But the lack of support for the study from Veterans Affairs (VA) is even more egregious.

Dr. Sue Sisley, the trial’s lead researcher, says she’s determined to focus on veterans for this study. She plans to examine the effects of cannabis on 76 subjects with treatment-resistant PTSD. Her main motivation in focusing on veterans is the epidemic of veteran suicides in the U.S. The VA estimates that about 22 veterans commit suicide every day – Sisley thinks that number is probably higher.

“As a scientist, I’m skeptical of subjective claims,” said Sisley. “[But] we have a mountain of anecdotal reports from veterans claiming that cannabis is lifesaving.”

The implications go beyond saving their lives – Sisley has heard plenty of military spouses and children sing the praises of the drug. “The kids will say, ‘I got my dad back’ after years of [him] being disengaged, irritable and mean,” she said.

Now, her main challenge is recruiting enough veterans who fit the study criteria and are able to participate on-site in Phoenix, Arizona. Sisley estimates that the Phoenix VA hospital has 20,000 veterans in their system who meet the study’s eligibility requirements. But the hospital is refusing to provide information about the study to its patients.

“[In] some of the states that have put in appropriate controls [for medical marijuana], there may be some evidence that this is beginning to be helpful,” said VA Secretary David Shulkin at a White House press briefing in May. “We’re interested in looking at that and learning from that.”

But Sisley says that Shulkin has so far refused to express support for her study: “It’s the height of hypocrisy,” she said.

“The VA Secretary could make a call to the Phoenix VA, and we could start sharing information with these patients,” said Sisley. “Why does it take political courage to defend a federally legal study? Not even defend it, just fast-track it. We’ve been stonewalled at every turn.”

The researchers have paid for various types of advertising and hired a veteran to oversee recruitment efforts. Still, “the issue for us is [getting] cooperation from the Phoenix VA hospital,” said Sisley. Recruitment has dwindled to a “pretty slow trickle.”

If the study fails to recruit 46 more veterans in the next couple of months, “we’ll have to reevaluate,” she said. “We fought for so many years and the veteran community has stood shoulder to shoulder with us, helping us kick down the doors… Many of them have adopted this trial as their own.”

The American Legion, a veterans organization that has more than 2 million members, called on the VA to support the clinical trial in September. “We ask for your direct involvement to ensure this critical research is fully enabled,” wrote the organization’s National Commander Denis Rohan in a letter to Shulkin. “[The study] could potentially produce scientific evidence that will enhance, improve, and save the lives of veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.”

But Shulkin has remained mum on the issue.

“I’m assuming that [Attorney General] Sessions has created an atmosphere of fear around the word ‘cannabis’ and so nobody’s willing to step out,” said Sisley. “The FDA deserves major commendation because they at least are responsive.”

CONTINUE READING…

"It's the height of hypocrisy,"…

FDA Is Open To Medical Marijuana For Vets, But Other Agencies Stand In The Way

Mona Zhang , Contributor

Dr. Sue Sisley, a medical marijuana researcher, speaks at the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office Wednesday, April 14, 2010 at the Capitol in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)

When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned cannabidiol producers against making medical claims about cannabis products, it seemed par for the course for any federal agency. Cannabis is simply not considered medicine in the eyes of the government.

But the FDA actually appears pretty open to considering the potential of marijuana as medicine. “We’ve had good experiences working with the FDA,” said Brad Burge, communications director at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS). The non-profit is currently conducting the first FDA- and DEA-approved clinical trial on whole-plant marijuana and enrolled its 30th participant on October 26.

“We have a long relationship with the FDA — a lot through our MDMA research. They’ve been open to approving research protocols into Schedule I drugs,” said Burge. “It’s other regulatory agencies that have been standing in the way.”

It’s certainly unhelpful that the National Institutes of Drug Abuse have a monopoly on growing research cannabis. The Drug Enforcement Administration and the Justice Department aren’t helpful on this front either. But the lack of support for the study from Veterans Affairs (VA) is even more egregious.

Dr. Sue Sisley, the trial’s lead researcher, says she’s determined to focus on veterans for this study. She plans to examine the effects of cannabis on 76 subjects with treatment-resistant PTSD. Her main motivation in focusing on veterans is the epidemic of veteran suicides in the U.S. The VA estimates that about 22 veterans commit suicide every day – Sisley thinks that number is probably higher.

“As a scientist, I’m skeptical of subjective claims,” said Sisley. “[But] we have a mountain of anecdotal reports from veterans claiming that cannabis is lifesaving.”

The implications go beyond saving their lives – Sisley has heard plenty of military spouses and children sing the praises of the drug. “The kids will say, ‘I got my dad back’ after years of [him] being disengaged, irritable and mean,” she said.

Now, her main challenge is recruiting enough veterans who fit the study criteria and are able to participate on-site in Phoenix, Arizona. Sisley estimates that the Phoenix VA hospital has 20,000 veterans in their system who meet the study’s eligibility requirements. But the hospital is refusing to provide information about the study to its patients.

“[In] some of the states that have put in appropriate controls [for medical marijuana], there may be some evidence that this is beginning to be helpful,” said VA Secretary David Shulkin at a White House press briefing in May. “We’re interested in looking at that and learning from that.”

But Sisley says that Shulkin has so far refused to express support for her study: “It’s the height of hypocrisy,” she said.

“The VA Secretary could make a call to the Phoenix VA, and we could start sharing information with these patients,” said Sisley. “Why does it take political courage to defend a federally legal study? Not even defend it, just fast-track it. We’ve been stonewalled at every turn.”

The researchers have paid for various types of advertising and hired a veteran to oversee recruitment efforts. Still, “the issue for us is [getting] cooperation from the Phoenix VA hospital,” said Sisley. Recruitment has dwindled to a “pretty slow trickle.”

If the study fails to recruit 46 more veterans in the next couple of months, “we’ll have to reevaluate,” she said. “We fought for so many years and the veteran community has stood shoulder to shoulder with us, helping us kick down the doors… Many of them have adopted this trial as their own.”

The American Legion, a veterans organization that has more than 2 million members, called on the VA to support the clinical trial in September. “We ask for your direct involvement to ensure this critical research is fully enabled,” wrote the organization’s National Commander Denis Rohan in a letter to Shulkin. “[The study] could potentially produce scientific evidence that will enhance, improve, and save the lives of veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.”

But Shulkin has remained mum on the issue.

“I’m assuming that [Attorney General] Sessions has created an atmosphere of fear around the word ‘cannabis’ and so nobody’s willing to step out,” said Sisley. “The FDA deserves major commendation because they at least are responsive.”

CONTINUE READING…

This meeting was not supposed to known to the public… “Frankfort, Anti-Marijuana Discussion”

I have been informed of these meetings taking place in Frankfort, Kentucky, this Thursday, October 12, 2017 @ 1:00pm.  I am posting the information here!  Please follow links to obtain more information!

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***Attention mark your calendars for this Thursday’s Anti Marijuana Discussion***

Should KY Veterans, or Public Protection Officers (Fire Fighters, Police, EMT) be criminals for trying to find a better quality of life?
Come show support for KY patient’s safe access to cannabis.
Thursday October 12, 2017 @ 1:00 P.M.
Capital Annex Room 154 (702 Capital Ave., Frankfort 40601)
Veterans, Military Affairs & Public Protection Committee

— in Kentucky State Capitol.

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Thursday, October 12, 2017

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10:00 am, Annex Room 131

PROGRAM REVIEW AND INVESTIGATIONS COMMITTEE

Agenda: Potential Legal Action Against Drug Industry for Contributing to Opioid Abuse in Kentucky; Purdue Pharma Settlement • Attorney General Andy Beshear Presentation of staff report Kentucky’s Foster Care System Responses by • Adria Johnson, Commissioner • Elizabeth Caywood, Executive Advisor, Department for Community Based Services • Kelly Stephens, Manager Court Services, Administrative Office of the Courts Available for questions • Officials from Personnel Cabinet

Members: Sen. Danny Carroll (Co-Chair), Rep. Lynn Bechler (Co-Chair), Sen. Tom Buford, Sen. Perry B. Clark, Sen. Wil Schroder, Sen. Dan “Malano” Seum, Sen. Reginald Thomas, Sen. Stephen West, Sen. Whitney Westerfield, Rep. Chris Fugate, Rep. Brian Linder, Rep. Donna Mayfield, Rep. Ruth Ann Palumbo, Rep. Rob Rothenburger, Rep. Arnold Simpson, Rep. Walker Thomas

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1:00 pm, Annex Room 154

INTERIM JOINT COMMITTEE ON VETERANS, MILITARY AFFAIRS, AND PUBLIC PROTECTION

Agenda: Pledge of Allegiance Distinguished Veteran Marijuana and Public Safety • Richard W. Sanders, Commissioner, Kentucky State Police • Van Ingram, Executive Director, Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy Staff • Ed Shemelya, Director, National Marijuana Initiative • Tony Coder, Director, State and Local Affairs, Smart Approaches to Marijuana School and Campus Safety • Alex Payne, Deputy Commissioner, Kentucky State Police • Mark Filburn, Commissioner, Department of Criminal Justice Training

Members: Sen. Albert Robinson (Co-Chair), Rep. Tim Moore (Co-Chair), Sen. Julian M. Carroll, Sen. Perry B. Clark, Sen. C.B. Embry, Sen. Denise Harper Angel, Sen. Ernie Harris, Sen. Jimmy Higdon, Sen. Stan Humphries, Sen. Dennis Parrett, Sen. Wil Schroder, Sen. Dan “Malano” Seum, Sen. Whitney Westerfield, Sen. Mike Wilson, Sen. Max Wise, Rep. Robert Benvenuti , Rep. Tom Burch, Rep. Will Coursey, Rep. Jeffery Donohue, Rep. Myron Dossett, Rep. Jim DuPlessis, Rep. Chris Fugate, Rep. Jeff Greer, Rep. Chris Harris, Rep. Mark Hart, Rep. Regina Huff, Rep. Dan Johnson, Rep. DJ Johnson, Rep. Donna Mayfield, Rep. Ruth Ann Palumbo, Rep. Brandon Reed, Rep. Rob Rothenburger, Rep. Dean Schamore, Rep. Walker Thomas

SOURCE LINK

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/legislativecalendarv2/sp_bss_calendar_/index

https://www.facebook.com/KY4MM/posts/1461959113839300

https://www.facebook.com/jaime.montalvo.3110?fref=ufi&rc=p

https://www.facebook.com/amy.stalk.3?fref=ufi&rc=p